Laws Affecting Part-Time Faculty Surveyed

Academe, November/December 2000 | Go to article overview

Laws Affecting Part-Time Faculty Surveyed


"State legislators are beginning to wake up and smell the coffee-in the commuter mugs gripped by part-time faculty zooming from class to class across town," says Ruth Flower, director of AAUP government relations. Flower staffs the Association's Committee on Government Relations, which has set up a subcommittee to study new laws and proposals affecting part-time professors. So far, the subcommittee has compiled a list of about two dozen recent laws and initiatives from more than fifteen states. They show that "legislators are starting to understand the plight of part-time professors," Flower says.

The laws and initiatives identified to date fall into five general categories: pay and benefits, due process, limitations on employment, collective bargaining, and studies.

Pay and Benefits

In California the legislature approved (but didn't fund) an incentive program that encourages counties to provide health-care benefits for part-time faculty members who work at least a 40 percent workload in community colleges. The Vermont legislature, as part of a "living wage" bill, has decided to study a purchasing-pool arrangement for adjunct faculty, employees of nonprofits, and others. A purchasing pool allows employees to buy into a group plan, which purchases health-care services at a reduced rate. A New Jersey bill would permit part-time faculty to buy into the state's health-care system (but without subsidy). And in both Arizona and Connecticut, faculty campaigned several years ago for healthcare coverage for part-time faculty.

Regarding retirement benefits, New Jersey law permits part-time and adjunct faculty who have been renewed for a second-year contract to participate in the state retirement plan, provided that they meet other requirements that apply to all participants. Maine law, on the other hand, permits its state retirement board to deny membership in the state retirement plan to adjuncts and part-time faculty.

Being treated as a professional is just as important to part-time faculty as it is to full-time professors. New California legislation allows counties to apply for state funds to pay for a specified number of office hours for part-time faculty. And an Arkansas statute specifically includes full-time, temporary instructors in a state-funded professional development program, and includes part-time faculty in a modified peer-review process. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Laws Affecting Part-Time Faculty Surveyed
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.