Crow Indian Photographer: The Work of Richard Throssel

By Siegel, Mark | Journal of American Culture (Malden, MA), Fall 1999 | Go to article overview

Crow Indian Photographer: The Work of Richard Throssel


Siegel, Mark, Journal of American Culture (Malden, MA)


Crow Indian Photographer: The Work of Richard Throssel. Peggy Albright, foreword by Joanna Cohan Scherer. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1997.

Peggy Albright's book is the first extensive study of Richard Throssel (1882-1933), a Creek Indian adopted into the Crow tribe. He lived and worked among the Crow beginning in 1902, photographing them extensively for both artistic and official purposes. After a brief introduction to Throssel as "an Indian who had no tribe" and the Crow community that took him in, Albright makes an extensive examination of his aesthetic foundation as someone with the ability-as well as the opportunity-to mediate between his adopted culture and the outside world. She then reproduces numerous Throssel photographs with explanatory comments by contemporary Crows.

Albright is very self-conscious in presenting Throssel's work; while the rediscovery of a thousand photographs of Native Americans taken by a Native American comprises a significant historical cache, she is sensitive to the exploitation, inaccurate interpretation, and political controversy such publications have invited in the past. The pictorial style of Native American photography pioneered by Edward Curtis often romanticized (or simply misrepresented) their subjects for dramatic effect, and Albright invites us to consider the extent to which Throssel participated in this tradition. Unlike many coffee table books, this book presents 74 of Throssel's plates but its emphasis clearly is on the photographer's relationship with his world; it is a thoughtful, painstaking examination of who Throssel was, who his subjects were, and the extent to which his work actually contributed to documenting and understanding Crow society.

Albright's discussion of Throssel's life and work provides crucial context for all his photographs. Another study might have either sanitized or politicized Throssel's apparently paradoxical biography, but Albright gives us the facts and allows us to draw our own conclusions. Until this publication, Throssel was known primarily for a series of 39 photos marketed to an affluent white audience under the title "Western Classics," which self-consciously sentimentalize the Indian past while proclaiming Throssel an "authentic Indian" in their advertising. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Crow Indian Photographer: The Work of Richard Throssel
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.