The Future of Education of Deaf Children: Implications of Population Projections

By Moores, Donald F. | American Annals of the Deaf, Spring 2004 | Go to article overview

The Future of Education of Deaf Children: Implications of Population Projections


Moores, Donald F., American Annals of the Deaf


The winter 2004 edition of the American Annals of the Deaf carried an article by Trevor Johnston titled "W(h)ither the Deaf Community? Population, Genetics, and the Future of Australian Sign Language." In his analysis of trends involving school enrollment, neonatal screening, and census data in Australia, Johnston concluded that the incidence of severe and profound childhood deafness has been less than traditionally assumed and currently is declining to even lower levels. Many of the issues Johnston raised have been discussed by other authors, but this is the first case to my knowledge where they have been discussed succinctly in a brief article.

Starting with a generally accepted assumption in many countries that early childhood deafness occurs in approximately 1 child per 1,000, Johnston reported that most studies have included children with losses ranging from mild to profound, with the majority of cases falling into the mild and moderate categories. For example, he cited the Colorado screening program, which reported that 2.5 children per 1,000 were identified as having a hearing loss, but that only 10% of these children, or 0.25 per 1,000, had a profound loss. Research from Great Britain has reported similar results and Johnston concluded from data in New South Wales that an upper limit of 0.7 per 1,000 would not be surprising for Australia.

Johnston attributed the apparent decline to a number of factors, chief of which has been improvements in medical cafe, with the most striking example being the development of a vaccine to control rubella. The last worldwide rubella epidemic occurred in the mid-1960s. Since then there has been a decline in early childhood deafness caused by nongenetic factors.

Other contributors to the decline include cochlear implantation, improved hearing aids, and, looming on the horizon, genetic screening and gene therapy. Since the completion of the Human Genome Project, a number of possibilities have arisen, along with serious moral issues. Most readers probably are familiar with the connexin 26 gene, which apparently accounts for roughly 50% of all heritable deafness. As Johnston reported, the gene can be identified through screening and so parents-to-be can make reproductive decisions based on that information. In fact, in vitro fertilization has been performed so that only a fertilized egg not carrying the connexin 26 gene would be selected and implanted. Johnston concluded that these developments have serious implications for education and for the Australian Deaf community as well as for Australian sign language (Auslan). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Future of Education of Deaf Children: Implications of Population Projections
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.