Conducting and Evaluating Professional Development Workshops Using Experiential Learning

By Myers, Brian E.; Roberts, T. Grady | NACTA Journal, June 2004 | Go to article overview

Conducting and Evaluating Professional Development Workshops Using Experiential Learning


Myers, Brian E., Roberts, T. Grady, NACTA Journal


Abstract

Faculty members are often called upon to design and deliver professional development workshops to a variety of clientele. This clientele could include county extension agents, agriscience teachers, producers, business owners, or local government officials. This article presents an experiential learning format in which faculty can accomplish the task of information dissemination in a manner that is both effective as well as enjoyable to workshop participants. Background information is presented for experiential learning and andragogy, which indicates that experiential learning is a teaching method that addresses the educational needs of adults. In addition, an example is provided for readers to use as a guide in developing their own professional development workshops. A brief discussion on evaluating professional development workshops is also included.

Introduction

Professional development workshops are routinely offered for agricultural education teachers and extension personnel. These educators attend these workshops to maintain their pedagogical and technical expertise. As such, the content presented varies greatly at these workshops. Professional development workshops can range from short workshops that may take only one hour to multi-day intensive workshops. Under the pretense of maximizing the information presented, these workshops often consist of a single or multiple presenter(s) that use a teacher-centered approach, such as a lecture, to deliver the content of the workshop. A teacher-centered approach is one that uses the teacher as the single focal point during the lesson. As such, the teacher is the single source of information and attempts to transfer that information to the participants (Bransford et al., 2000). Although appropriate for some topics, teacher-centered approaches are overused and often not the most effective means in presenting professional development workshops.

Practicing educators have discovered that using student-centered approaches that allow students to become actively involved in their education are more successful in teaching the content and maintaining student interest. Student-centered approaches seek to allow students to actively interact with the phenomenon being studied. The instructor takes more of a facilitator role and guides students as they learn the content. These methods include problem solving, cooperative learning, laboratory activities, and experiential learning. These same methods can be used to effectively deliver professional development workshops to teachers, extension personnel, and other adult audiences. Experiential learning has great potential for delivering professional development workshops and is the focus of this report.

The purpose of this article is to provide a guide to using experiential learning as the methodology to deliver professional development workshops to teachers, extension personnel, or other adult audiences. The material presented in this paper may benefit faculty members, administrators, teachers, extension specialists, and extension agents that are called upon to conduct these professional development workshops.

To facilitate a better understanding of experiential learning, this article contains information on professional development workshops and experiential learning. Also included in this article is an example of how to use experiential learning when conducting a professional workshop and how to evaluate a professional development workshop conducted in this manner. Finally, several resources are listed for further study on this topic.

Professional Development Workshops

Professional development programs have taken many shapes in the past. One of the major questions facing a designer of professional development is selecting a proper format for the workshop. When addressing these design questions, one should begin by defining the term "workshop." This is a term that is commonly used to describe professional development opportunities, yet can take on several meanings. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Conducting and Evaluating Professional Development Workshops Using Experiential Learning
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.