Reclaiming Heimat: Trauma and Mourning in Memoirs by Jewish Austrian Reémigrés by Jacqueline Vansant

By Applegate, Celia | Shofar, Winter 2004 | Go to article overview

Reclaiming Heimat: Trauma and Mourning in Memoirs by Jewish Austrian Reémigrés by Jacqueline Vansant


Applegate, Celia, Shofar


Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 2001. 197 pp. $34.95.

Jacqueline Vansant has written a sensitive and nuanced account of how seven Austrians wrote about their experiences of exile from and return to their homeland (Heimat). She characterizes the nine books of these seven authors as a "select body of memoir literature" and devotes her own analytical and interpretive efforts first to explaining what they all have in common: all were born Jewish, all "experienced the Anschluss [the integration of Austria into the National Socialist state of Germany in 1938] as life-threatening and were all adults at the time they left Austria," and all returned to Austria permanently after 1945 (pp. 15-16). Their commonality tells us, in turn, about such fundamental historical and cognitive issues as the nature of home, familiarity, and personal identity, the nature of memory and the act of remembrance, the act of writing and its relation to social and even political authority, and above all, the personal impact of this past century's terrible legacy of suffering and loss. Vansant deserves credit for gathering in one book this gifted array of writers and this rich array of themes, and she does justice to her own central concern, which is to highlight the difficulties of both defining and "reclaiming" a sense of homeland for so marginalized and persecuted a group as Jewish Austrians. If her account left this reviewer wishing to dispense with the hermeneutics and go right to the memoirs themselves, then that is all the more to her credit. She has brought an important, if "select," body of writing to our attention, marked it out from the flood of memoir literature, much of it Holocaust-related, and provided us with concepts by which to understand it more deeply.

In Vansant's telling, the fundamental problem that faced these writers as they sat down to recount their past was the shattering of their sense of belonging which the Nazi era wrought upon their lives. She relies heavily on another Austrian writer (not one of her memoirists), Harms Maier, a.k.a. Jean Améry, to account for this shattering. Améry's own experiences included, of course, not only persecution and exile, but extended torture at the hands of the Gestapo followed by imprisonment in Auschwitz -- all of which he survived, but hardly intact. In Améry's postwar writings, his essential message was one of loss and destruction to the point of, literally, no return. One could not recover what had been lost and taken and tortured away from one, neither one's previous identity, nor one's physical and social space in a society, nor one's connections to other human beings with whom one used to associate. Although Vansant acknowledges the gulf dividing Améry's total despair from the essentially hopeful stance of her memoirists (return is, in their cases, an expression of hope), she uses his extreme conclusions to understand at least some of what her own memoirists faced. …

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