South Carolina Historical Society: Recently Processed Manuscripts

South Carolina Historical Magazine, January 2004 | Go to article overview

South Carolina Historical Society: Recently Processed Manuscripts


The following manuscript collections are now available for research by society patrons. The society welcomes gifts of manuscript collections and publications relating to South Carolina. Such gifts can be designated charitable contributions and are eligible for income tax deductions.

Descriptions of all of the society's manuscripts can be viewed at http://www.schistory.org.

0281.00 William Cain family

Papers, 1704-ca. 1975.

Ca. 3 linear ft.

William Cain (1792-1878) was a St. Johns (Berkeley) Parish, S.C., plantation owner, state legislator, and lieutenant governor of South Carolina. He was the son of Daniel Cain (d. 1794). William Cain and Isaac Marion Dwight purchased Somerset Plantation in 1827, and Cain later bought Dwight's share. He added lands to Somerset and also acquired Somerton Plantation. William Cain first married Anna Maria Dubose, who died in 1827. His second wife was Ann Palmer, daughter of Joseph Palmer and Catherine Porcher.

The bulk of this collection consists of property records dating back to the early grants for lands that would become Somerton and Somerset Plantations in Berkeley County (S.C.). Property records, most of which are oversize, include: a fragment of a grant to John Midon (or Medon), with an attached plat (1711) for 207 acres in Berkeley County; a grant (1713) to Champernoun (or Champernown) Elliot; a grant (1717) of 125 acres to Elizabeth Wetherick; a lease (1728) for 325 acres, by Elizabeth Wetherick to Paul Ravenel; a detailed plat (1818) of land belonging to Thomas Porcher (probably White Hall Plantation); a title (1838) to Mitton (or Mitten) Plantation; and a plat (n.d.) of Oakfield Plantation.

The papers of William Cain include: correspondence (1830s-1870s); slave records, including bills of sales, lists, and a mortgage (1845; oversize) on fifteen slaves (named in document); estate records; miscellaneous items, including a broadside (1831; oversize) for the State Rights and Free Trade Association; and muniments, beginning with a copy of a 1704 grant of 760 acres to Lambert Landers. Other persons named in the muniments include: Paul Ravenel (and other Ravenel family members), Abraham and Thomas Chinners, Daniel Cain, Frederick A. Porcher, Isaac M. Dwight, Benjamin Dehay, Jr., Paul Durant, Samuel Jerman Palmer, David N. Carlile, Daniel Cahusac, Morton Waring, Jr., and Blake Leay White.

Cain family papers consist of: correspondence (1876-1912); estate records of Daniel Cain; genealogical notes; miscellaneous material, including papers concerning a book about St. Stephen's Episcopal Church and meteorological records (1940s?) for Pinopolis (S.C.) kept by Mrs. Florence R. Lucas; property records, mostly pertaining to Cain and Porcher family lands (Pooshee, Somerton, and Somerset Plantations) in Berkeley County which were lost to the Santee-Cooper hydroelectric project; and writings, including poems and part of a manuscript history of Berkeley County.

Photographs from this collection have been catalogued separately.

0282.00 Gooch family

Papers, 1754-1947.

3.5 linear ft.

John Gooch (1780-1840), a plantation owner of Chester District, S.C., was the father of Henry H. Gooch (1811-1883) of Lancaster District, S.C., who married Martha Trusdel Gooch (1812-1892) in 1832. Their son Henry H. Gooch, Jr. (b. 1842) married Mary J. McIlwain in 1869. Mary Lula Gooch (b. 1872), (daughter of Henry H. Gooch, Jr.?), married Halcott J. Beckham, who was the son of Lewis A. Beckham and Charlotte Massey.

These papers chiefly consist of correspondence, financial and estate records, and property records. Included are papers of John Gooch, Henry H. Gooch, Henry H. Gooch, Jr., H. B. Gooch, W. H. Gooch, H. J. Beckham, and J. R. Massey, as well as estate records (1843-1869) of Dr. J. T. Walker.

The papers (1817-1872) of John Gooch include: business and financial records, some of which pertain to Gooch & Richardson; correspondence (1835-1839); and extensive estate records (1840-1872), among which are some bequests to slaves and his will (1840) naming slaves bequeathed to his family. …

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