Cultural Diversity?: Don't Forget the Disabled!

By Fuller, John | Law & Order, November 2000 | Go to article overview

Cultural Diversity?: Don't Forget the Disabled!


Fuller, John, Law & Order


Within the context of Community Policing, the term "cultural diversity" is thought to represent the various ethnic, racial and religious segments that comprise the American social mosaic. Often, however, we neglect to include another identifiably diverse social group: the disabled persons, formerly known as the handicapped.

As legally defined by the Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA), a person is disabled if he or she has a mental or physical impairment that substantially limits a major life activity, which can include such basic bodily functions as walking, seeing, hearing, breathing and even standing or sitting.

An estimated 49 million people in the United States have a disability. Over 24 million of them have a severe disability and more than half of the U.S. population, over age 65, is disabled in some way, shape or form. Statistically, a significant portion of the U.S. population is disabled or physically limited in some meaningful degree. As police administrators, the chances are good your people will be interacting with the disabled more frequently than you previously imagined.

Many well-intentioned police officers have uncomfortable attitudes toward the disabled, often viewing them as individuals to be pitied or ignored. This attitude may originate from an uneasiness of being around people who are perceived to be "different," or simply from ignorance about disabilities in general. There are many forms of human disabilities; some of the more prominent types can include the following:

Mobility-Impaired

People with mobilityimpairments use assistive devices such as crutches, walkers or, most commonly, wheelchairs.

Blind or Visually-Impaired People with 20/200 vision with best correction are legally blind. Some blind people do have some residual sight.

Deaf or Hearing Impaired

Many deaf people are born deaf while others may become deaf due to early childhood illnesses. Hardof-hearing people are born with normal hearing, but their hearing becomes impaired due to disease, old age or occupational hazards.

Developmentally Disabled

Developmental disabilities include mental retardation, autism, cerebral palsy and epilepsy. A handy mnemonic is MACE. These conditions are characterized as "developmental" because they appear during a person's early, developing years.

Mental retardation is a serious inability to learn and to function appropriately in normal social situations. Mental retardation is a permanent condition and should not be confused with mental illness, which can be of temporary duration.

Cerebral palsy is a brain disorder that affects muscle control and sensory functions and is characterized by involuntary and uncontrollable body movements. Epilepsy is a disorder of the central nervous system, distinguished by sudden seizures, convulsions and loss of consciousness. Autism is typified by interpersonal communication problems and compulsive behavior, along with a corresponding lack of social awareness.

Mentally Ill Persons

Mental illness can be psychotic, which is a progressive disintegration of an individual's personality, or functional, which is due to overwhelming stress coupled with an individual's inability to adequately cope. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Cultural Diversity?: Don't Forget the Disabled!
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.