An Investigation of Students' Perceptions of Multicultural Education Experiences in a School of Education

By Bhargava, Ambika; Hawley, Lisa D. et al. | Multicultural Education, Summer 2004 | Go to article overview

An Investigation of Students' Perceptions of Multicultural Education Experiences in a School of Education


Bhargava, Ambika, Hawley, Lisa D., Scott, Chaunda L., Stein, Mary, Phelps, Adelaide, Multicultural Education


Introduction

Changing demographics and the need for professionals to understand perspectives and beliefs of others has led many to reflect on the extent to which diversity issues are integrated into undergraduate and graduate programs (Heuberger, Gerber, & Anderson, 1999). This is particularly true as teachers and helping professionals are considered catalysts of change. However, educators need specific knowledge, skills and attitudes to influence the world in which they live. Banks (2001) stated that it is only when teachers are empowered that they have the ability to influence their personal, social, political and economic worlds.

The past twenty years of educational research include studies that describes the importance of muliticultural education. However, Smith (1998) discussed not only an absence of multicultural education as a content knowledge base in teacher education programs, but also indicated the lack of a knowledge base among instructors and professors who teach such courses. Although Smith (1998) advocated culturally responsive pedagogy as a moral and ethical responsibility in the preparation of teachers, the integration of multicultural perspectives has been difficult to achieve.

Both the standards for the National Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) and the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Education Programming (CACREP) require multicultural training as integral in the training of teachers and school counselors. Yet, there is a lack in the literature regarding the overall effectiveness of this training across schools of education and human services.

Nieto (2000) asserted that one must become a multicultural person before one can become a multicultural teacher -this involves a transformational re-education. First, she said, individuals must learn more about people and events about which they know little. This knowledge could come from literature, cultural activities, appropriate and accurate media outlets, or other sources. Second, individuals need to successfully traverse the process of confronting individual racism and bias that are often so deeply rooted as to be unconscious. The dissonance that often occurs in cultural training experiences requires a high level of expertise by professors in teacher and counselor training institutions.

Assessment of Efforts

Assessment of teacher education programs and efforts in infusing multicultural education reveal that we have a long way to go. Vacarr (2001) argued that while college campuses have focused on training teachers for working in diverse environments and transforming the curriculum to embody multiculturalism, a gap exists between conceptual understandings and the ability to respond to classroom challenges involving differences. Globetti, Globetti, Brown, and Smith's (1993) instrument measuring university students' multicultural awareness and sensitivity found that although students were aware of various subcultures on campus, they lacked sensitivity in terms of responding to differences.

Moreover, White students exhibited a lack of sensitivity toward African-Americans and were reluctant to interact with different racial minority groups. Rumill, Harshorn, and Gordon (1994) sought to determine the effect that stereotypes had on how university students rated students who were from different racial, ethnic, or religious groups than their own. They found that White college students judged their black peers' credentials on the basis of skin color. These results were attributed, in part, to the lack of knowledge and experiences many white college students have with people of different colors and cultures.

Rudney, Marxen, and Risku (1996) found that students overwhelmingly agreed on the importance of multicultural education in their role as teacher. However, their survey of preservice teachers' field placement experiences in an urban setting revealed that, "graduates were most likely to speak in generalities regarding the importance of meeting the needs of diverse student populations and least likely to provide examples of appropriate theory-based professional action" (p. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

An Investigation of Students' Perceptions of Multicultural Education Experiences in a School of Education
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.