Bleep! Censoring Rock and Rap Music

By Black, Gregory D. | Journalism History, Summer 2000 | Go to article overview

Bleep! Censoring Rock and Rap Music


Black, Gregory D., Journalism History


Winfield, Betty Houchin and Sandra Davidson, eds. Bleep! Censoring Rock and Rap Music Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1999.114 pp. $55.

The arts-painting, photography, film, theater, literature, and music-have long been lightening rods for would-be censors. In recent American history, popular music has both entertained millions of fans and outraged moral guardians who saw new music forms-jazz, rock 'n' roll and, most recently, gangster rap-as a frontal attack on traditional values.

Ignoring the First Amendment, moral guardians from Pat Robertson to Tipper Gore to William Bennett have called for either outright censorship of music lyrics or demanded warning labels on CD's to alert potential customers to explicit language.

Bleep!, a small anthology of very brief essays first presented at a conference on censorship at the University of Missouri-Columbia, addresses the historical, legal, and cultural issues surrounding the controversy over rock and rap music.

There is little doubt that the lyrics of rock and roll shocked millions of white middle-class Americans. As Michael J. Budds notes in his essay, "From Fine Romance to Gook Rockin," white middle-class Americans were aghast to see their sons and daughters gyrating to the pulsating beat of African-American artists such as Fats Domino, Chuck Berry, Little Richard, and Bo Diddley or swooning to the Dominoes' rendition of "60 Minute Man," a song which left little to the imagination of kids or parents.

The music, often labeled "jungle" or "race" music, was identified as African-American and took on racism, social injustice, hypocrisy, and other social issues that made older Americans, who grew up with Tin Pan Alley romanticism, extremely uncomfortable. So uncomfortable, notes Betty Houchin Winfield in her essay, "Because of the Children," that the FBI spent years and millions of dollars investigating rock artists. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Bleep! Censoring Rock and Rap Music
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.