Community Police Officer Pre-Employment Exam

Law & Order, December 2000 | Go to article overview

Community Police Officer Pre-Employment Exam


PRODUCT SPOTLIGHT

"Assessing the total person for the job"

The most important decision made by a police department is the selection of those who will represent the department on the street: the individuals who will stand beside officers as their colleagues. As a result, it is difficult to overestimate the value of an effective selection program for entry-level officers. This is true whether a department is hiring a number of officers or just one. It is true in times of high unemployment and in periods of low unemployment, as now. An effective or valid selection tool maximizes the effectiveness of police performance and the return on training dollars. The lack of such a tool not only negatively impacts costs and service delivery, but also the overall functioning and morale of a department.

What the test predicts

Darany and Associates offers a police officer examination, DELPOE, that has been demonstrated to identify those candidates who will become the most effective officers for community policing. The DELPOE examination was developed based upon validation research with a number of police departments and has successfully predicted performance both in the academy and on the job.

The test was designed around an examination structure now described as ideal by federal regulatory agencies and one that is also enthusiastically supported by testing professionals. Simply stated, this structure leads to the development and use of examinations to assess more of the whole person for the whole job. This is in contrast to a more traditional and limited exam that might stop with testing just those factors that we can readily develop a written exam for: traditional cognitive factors such as reading and math skills. …

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