Nonprofit Governance Library

By Flanagan, Derek A. | The CPA Journal, August 2004 | Go to article overview

Nonprofit Governance Library


Flanagan, Derek A., The CPA Journal


Nonprofit Governance Library American Bar Association and the American Society of Corporate Secretaries: 2002; $99.95 each (1-9 copies); $89.95 each (10-25 copies)

Nonprofit Governance and Management; editor-in-chief, Victor Futter, managing editors, Judith A. Cion and George W. Overton; 717 pages; ISBN: 1-59031-041-1.

Nonprofit Resources: A Companion to Nonprofit Governance, editor, Victor Futter; 50 pages; ISBN: 1 -59031-042-X.

Guidebook for Directors of Nonprofit Corporations, Committee on Nonprofit Corporations; editors, George W. Overton and Jeannie Carmedelle Frey

Last year, The New York Times published a special section covering charitable organizations titled "Giving" and subtitled "Unguarded Assets." One of the lead articles began, "America has the world's biggest collection of charities, but oversight of the nonprofit sector is parochial, piecemeal, political and, at times, accidental."

While such a broad indictment of regulators and nonprofit leaders seems unfair, no doubt some of the well-publicized scandals of recent years point out the need for due care on the part of board members and senior managers of nonprofit organizations. Current attempts to adapt the Sarbanes-Oxley Act for the nonprofit sector clearly represent a desire for increased scrutiny on the part of nonprofit leaders.

These individuals would be well served by reading either of two publications. The first, Nonprofit Governance and Management, is a collection of 45 chapters. Contributors include managers of nonprofit organizations, as well as attorneys, accountants, fundraising professionals, and other consultants serving the nonprofit community. This updated and expanded edition of the 1997 Nonprofit Governance: The Executive's Guide contains 20 chapters that are entirely new, six with new authors, and the remaining 19 chapters have been reviewed and updated.

While this book would be useful for anyone involved in the oversight of nonprofit organizations, it is invaluable to those new to the sector, especially those at smaller organizations that may have board members or executive staff with limited nonprofit or corporate experience.

The topics overlap, but this serves to reinforce understanding of these issues. And although the writing quality is somewhat uneven, which is probably unavoidable with 42 contributors, on the whole the material is well written. Most organizations will find that the vast majority of the topics apply to them. The topics build on each other, providing the reader with a well-rounded presentation of the issues involved.

The breadth of the subject matter is impressive. Many organizations may find the chapter titled "A Proposal Writing Short Course" alone to be worth the price of the book. This chapter takes the reader through the steps of one suggested approach to the grantmaking process. The chapter on lobbying and advocacy does a good job of presenting the basic dos and don'ts. While readers will have to look elsewhere for more detail on some subjects, this book is an excellent resource on the basics (and then some), and will be a useful reference for years to come. …

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