Editor's NOTE

By Pomper, Miles A. | Arms Control Today, June 2004 | Go to article overview

Editor's NOTE


Pomper, Miles A., Arms Control Today


With this issue, Arms Control Today debuts a fresh look designed to make the magazine more appealing and useful. New additions include regular reviews of important books, eye-catching graphics, a new "InBrief" section, and geographic departments that organize our news reporting in a clear and easy-to-use format.

Still, our essential role remains the same as it has been for more than three decades: to provide our readers with original, authoritative reporting and incisive commentary on nuclear, chemical, biological, and conventional weapons by our staff and outside experts, as well as in-depth interviews with leading figures in the field.

This month's issue includes an interview with Assistant Secretary of State for Nonproliferation John Wolf. In the interview, Wolf defends the Bush administration's controversial approach to arms control. This approach has placed far greater emphasis on punishing noncompliance with international norms by "rogue regimes," such as North Korea, Iran, and Iraq, than on disarmament steps in which the United States and other declared major powers would be required to participate.

Our cover story touches on a key element of administration policy: the Proliferation Security Initiative, unveiled by President George W. Bush one year ago. Jofi Joseph, a former Senate Foreign Relations Committee staffer, offers the first comprehensive evaluation of the initiative, which seeks to improve intelligence sharing and coordination in order to interdict shipments of nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons and their related delivery systems. …

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