Book Reviews -- Partisans of the Southern Press: Editorial Spokesmen of the Nineteenth Century by Carl R. Osthaus

By Kaul, Arthur J. | Journalism History, Spring 1995 | Go to article overview

Book Reviews -- Partisans of the Southern Press: Editorial Spokesmen of the Nineteenth Century by Carl R. Osthaus


Kaul, Arthur J., Journalism History


Osthaus, Carl R. Partisans of the Southern Press: Editorial Spokesmen of the Nineteenth Century. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1994. 294 pp. $39.95.

"The history of Southern journalism has yet to be written," Carl R. Osthaus aptly observes in this significant scholarly contribution to that unwritten history. Partisans of the Southern Press examines the region's journalism from the Old South through Sectionalism, Civil War, and Reconstruction to the emergence of the New South.

The author, an associate professor of history at Oakland University, concentrates on the South's colorful and powerful "editorial giants" in each era because "the editor completely dominated journalism and monopolized the dissemination of news (or what passed for 'news')" and because "their work, considered collectively, illuminates key aspects of Southern daily newspaper history in the nineteenth century."

His essays begin with Thomas Ritchie of the Richmond Enquirer (1804-1845) and the Washington Daily, Union (1845- 1851). He was a partisan editor who, an admirer said, had taught Virginians "to think his own thoughts, to speak his own words, to weep when he wept, to wreath their faces with his smiles, and, over and above all, to vote as he voted."

In the nation's third largest city, the New Orleans Daily Picayune between 1837 and 1850 was "the first of its kind in the South," a paper that modeled itself on the penny press of the Northeast with large doses of local, human-interest news in a brash, flippant style, and a penchant for sensationalism. "We leave profundity to those who prefer profound sleep," the paper once remarked.

The Charleston Mercury, edited by fire-eater Robert Barnwell Rhett, Jr., and Aaron Willington's and Richard Yeadon' s politically moderate unionist-leaning Charleston Daily Courier represent "the triumph of sectional journalism" in the years leading to the bombing of Fort Sumter 1861. Rhett's style "helped mold the Northern view of Southern journalism," Osthaus writes, "and yet the rival Courier was always the more successful newspaper, having greater circulation, larger profits, and better news coverage."

John M. Daniel's Richmond Examiner illuminates "the role of the editor in the Southern cause and the limitations and paradoxes of Confederate press freedom" in wartime. The paper's extremism, intolerance, and "swaggering hotheadedness" publicized "every flaw, real or imaginary, in the [Jefferson] Davis administration's management of the war effort," Osthaus writes. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Book Reviews -- Partisans of the Southern Press: Editorial Spokesmen of the Nineteenth Century by Carl R. Osthaus
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.