Book Reviews -- AIDS Today, Tomorrow: An Introduction to the New HIV Epidemic in America by Robert Searles Walker

The Journal of Social, Political, and Economic Studies, Summer 1995 | Go to article overview

Book Reviews -- AIDS Today, Tomorrow: An Introduction to the New HIV Epidemic in America by Robert Searles Walker


AIDS Today, Tomorrow: An Introduction to the New HIV Epidemic in America

Robert Searles Walker

Humanities Press International, New Jersey, 1991

In a broad-based introduction to the multiple issues generated by the AIDS epidemic, Dr. Walker utilizes a wide range of data culled from diverse sources in an integrated, manageable way to produce this coherent synthesis. It is aimed directly at students taking courses dealing with contemporary social issues, sociology, social anthropology and sexually transmitted diseases and will also be useful to those educated readers who are curious to understand the epidemic.

HIV has only been known to the Western world for about 40 years. Originating in remote villages of sub-Saharan Africa, it must have been carried by migrants to the more developed world. Its first impact in the United States, leading to the death of a young person, mystified the medical world. However, samples of his tissue and blood were stored, and as the disease spread through American cities in the 980s, and came to be identified, so it was revealed that he had died of AIDS.

For a long period, Asia remained very little affected, possibly because there was little migration from Africa to Asia, and until 1984 just five America cities accounted for 63% of the cases reported in the U. …

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Book Reviews -- AIDS Today, Tomorrow: An Introduction to the New HIV Epidemic in America by Robert Searles Walker
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