Book Reviews -- the Papers of Thomas Jefferson. Volume 25: January 1793 to May 1793 Edited by John Catanzariti, Eugene R. Sheridan, J. Jefferson Looney, George H. Hoemann, Ruth W. Lester and Elizabeth Peters Blazejewski

By Schulz, Constance B. | The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, July 1994 | Go to article overview

Book Reviews -- the Papers of Thomas Jefferson. Volume 25: January 1793 to May 1793 Edited by John Catanzariti, Eugene R. Sheridan, J. Jefferson Looney, George H. Hoemann, Ruth W. Lester and Elizabeth Peters Blazejewski


Schulz, Constance B., The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography


The Papers of Thomas Jefferson. Volume 25: January 1793 to May 1793. Edited by JOHN CATANZARITI, EUGENE R. SHERIDAN, J. JEFFERSON LOONEY, GEORGE H. HOEMANN, RUTH W. LESTER, and ELIZABETH PETERS BLAZETEWSKI. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1992. xliii, 773 pp.

Two hundred and fifty years after the birth of Thomas Jefferson, and fifty years after the 1943 beginnings of this monumental modern edition of his papers under the direction of Julian P. Boyd, the Jefferson papers project issued the twenty-fifth volume of series I (correspondence) covering most of the first half of his fiftieth year. Neither Jefferson nor his correspondents mention this event. Much of the correspondence in this volume is concerned with Jefferson's duties as secretary of state, but among the more than six hundred documents are letters, notes, and reports dealing with a broad range of domestic political affairs and Jefferson's personal family, scientific, and financial concerns. Much of Jefferson's incoming correspondence in this volume consists of reports from agents, merchants, diplomats, and others in Europe concerned over the effect of the war on American trade. More than fifty of these often lengthy reports--many of them in languages other than English--are summarized in small type rather than printed in full.

Senior Editor John Catanzariti has in this volume cautiously returned to an earlier, much-criticized Boyd editorial policy of providing introductory notes to groups of related documents. Notably absent from these introductory explanations is the editorial (as opposed to Jeffersonian) anti-Hamiltonian bias that marked Boyd's last volumes. Three of the four such brief introductory essays delineate the complex political context of the escalating quarrel between Jefferson and Alexander Hamilton, secretary of the treasury, over the effect of Hamilton's financial policies on republican principles and the effect of Jefferson's diplomatic actions on American neutrality during the international crisis of war between England and France. Much of early 1793 was taken up with the political maneuvering of Republicans in and out of Congress to discredit Hamilton and force him to resign by challenging his management of public finances. The note on pages 172-74 introduces four brief documents related to the application of France to use American indebtedness from the Revolution to finance purchase in the United States of food and other supplies badly needed by French citizens. Jefferson used the occasion to raise doubts about Hamilton's handling of foreign loans. A lengthier note (pp. 280-92) examines Jefferson's involvement in the Giles resolutions, overwhelmingly defeated by the House of Representatives, which would have censured Hamilton's financial conduct and severely limited his financial flexibility as secretary of the treasury. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Book Reviews -- the Papers of Thomas Jefferson. Volume 25: January 1793 to May 1793 Edited by John Catanzariti, Eugene R. Sheridan, J. Jefferson Looney, George H. Hoemann, Ruth W. Lester and Elizabeth Peters Blazejewski
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.