Book Reviews -- A Chesapeake Family and Their Slaves: A Study in Historical Archaeology (New Studies in Archaeology) by Anne Elizabeth Yentsch

By King, Julia A. | The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, July 1995 | Go to article overview

Book Reviews -- A Chesapeake Family and Their Slaves: A Study in Historical Archaeology (New Studies in Archaeology) by Anne Elizabeth Yentsch


King, Julia A., The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography


A Chesapeake Family and Their Slaves: A Study in Historical Archaeology. By ANNE ELIZABETH YENTSCH. New Studies in Archaeology. COLIN RENFREW and JEREMY SABLOFF, Series Editors. Cambridge, New York, and Melbourne: Cambridge University Press, 1994. xxxiii, 433 pp. $24.95 paper.

ALTHOUGH historical archaeologists argue that their discipline potentially offers a different way of understanding the past, few studies have emerged that cast genuinely new light on historical interpretations. Part of the problem can be attributed to archaeological methods and categories; the latter often bear little resemblance to categories of social and cultural phenomena. In A Chesapeake Family and Their Slaves, Anne Elizabeth Yentsch overcomes this fundamental problem by expanding the definition of what constitutes archaeological evidence. The focus of the book is eighteenth-century Chesapeake culture, not artifacts, although artifacts are integral to the book's purpose. As a result, this fascinating "study in historical archaeology" is an especially important substantive and methodological contribution to the literature on colonial life in the Chesapeake.

A Chesapeake Family and Their Slaves focuses on the Calvert household in eighteenth-century Annapolis, Maryland. In 1715, young Charles Calvert, the fifth Lord Baltimore, inherited the proprietorship of Maryland, and he depended heavily on his relatives in the colony to represent proprietary interests. These relatives, composing an extensive kinship network, maintained a townhouse in Annapolis beginning in the late 1720s. As many as three Calvert men and their families had access to the Annapolis house in the decades preceding the Revolutionary War, and thirty slaves were living there in 1734. This large household resided on a spacious lot adjacent to State Circle, within view of the colonial statehouse.

Using kinship charts, documents, secondary historical research, paintings, architecture, and artifacts, Yentsch assembles a detailed ethnographic narrative showing how black and white members of the Calvert household used material culture in the negotiation of social identity and social relationships. For example, while the Calvert house provided shelter for the proprietor's kin in the colony's capital, it also served as a powerful symbol to its occupants and to other Maryland colonists. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Book Reviews -- A Chesapeake Family and Their Slaves: A Study in Historical Archaeology (New Studies in Archaeology) by Anne Elizabeth Yentsch
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.