Law Review Digests-Colleges and Universities

Journal of Law and Education, January 2001 | Go to article overview

Law Review Digests-Colleges and Universities


Robert B. Groholski, The Right to Representation by Counsel in University Disciplinary Proceedings: A Denial of Due Process of Law, 19 N. ILL. U. L. REv. 739 (1999). A university student facing expulsion risks losing both liberty and property because a college education is a requirement for many jobs and the student has paid tuition for that education. The question of how much due process should be afforded such individuals is usually based on a balancing comprised of the student's interests on the one hand and the interests of the university on the other. While counsel has sometimes been limited to an advisory role in these university proceedings, the author advocates that the interests of the student outweigh those of the university and the student should therefore be given full rights to representation by counsel. Such a procedure would better balance the arguments of the inexperienced student against those of a well administered university.

Kenneth Lasson, Controversial Speakers on Campus: Liberties, Limitations, and Common-Sense Guidelines, 12 ST. THOMAS L. REv. 39 (1999). There has been intense debate as to whether universities can limit and/or restrict a speaker and her speech once it allows the speaker on campus. The Constitution prohibits discrimination against a speaker based on a particular viewpoint. The only substantial reason that a speaker can be excluded or canceled by a university is when the speaker is thought to bring an imminent threat of violence and a security risk to the campus.

Walter Block & Roy Whitehead Jr., Direct Payment of State Scholarship Funds to Church-Related Colleges Offend the Constitution and Title VI, 14 BYU J. PUB. L. 191 (2000). The Arkansas Governor's Distinguished Scholar's Program was created to keep the state's best and brightest students within the state. However, the program has been criticized as violating the Establishment Clause of the first amendment by recognizing established religion. Students selected for the program can attend the college or university of his or her choice within the state, meaning students can elect to attend a church-related institution. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Law Review Digests-Colleges and Universities
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.