President Signs Defense Appropriations Bill

Army, September 2004 | Go to article overview

President Signs Defense Appropriations Bill


President George W. Bush signed into law a $417.5 billion defense bill for fiscal year 2005 on August 5. He said that breakthroughs have made warfare more precise, thus reducing battlefield casualties and added, "This bill continues that progress by funding the technologies that are changing the way we fight wars in order to keep the peace."

The new law is a $25 billion increase over last year's defense act. Congress still has to pass the fiscal 2005 National Defense Authorization bill before the Department of Defense can spend the money, except for the $25 billion Emergency Wartime Appropriation for current operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. The law includes a 3.5 percent pay raise for servicemembers, the elimination of out-of-pocket housing expenses and continued funding for military Transformation. The Defense Health Program is also fully funded with $18.2 billion. Walter Reed Army Medical Center will receive $19.2 million to improve amputee care. Readiness factors, such as tank miles and flying hours, are fully funded to ensure the forces are trained for the global war on terrorism. Research and development will receive almost $70 billion, including money for continued development of unmanned aerial vehicles and the Army's Future Combat System.

The new law also provides $1.5 billion above the President's original budget request to recapitalize combat vehicles and helicopters and to procure ammunition. The money funds the fielding of an additional Army Stryker brigade, the modernization of the Bradley fighting vehicle and the purchase of eight more Chinook and 12 Black Hawk helicopters for the National Guard. More than $121 billion will go towards operations and maintenance accounts. Missile defense programs will receive $10 billion. About $4.6 billion will go to a ground-based missile defense program and almost $1 billion for the Patriot-3 theater missile systems.

The President concluded his remarks by saying, "By taking care of our service people in uniform, by addressing the threats of today, by preparing for the threats of tomorrow, this bill will help make America a safer place. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

President Signs Defense Appropriations Bill
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.