Integrating Nutrition and Parenting Practices for Young Families: A Report of Two Statewide Projects

By Grogan, Soneeta; Brink, Muriel S. et al. | Journal of Family and Consumer Sciences, January 1, 2000 | Go to article overview

Integrating Nutrition and Parenting Practices for Young Families: A Report of Two Statewide Projects


Grogan, Soneeta, Brink, Muriel S., Yerka, Bettie Lee, Journal of Family and Consumer Sciences


ABSTRACT

This study focuses on results from two pilot nutrition projects, which integrated parenting concepts into nutrition education experiences. Strategies involved (I) focusing parenting content on the related nutrition project outcomes; (2) using learner-centered educational strategies; and (3) modeling desirable parent- child interactions. Staff development content for educators included (1) incorporating parenting concepts into nutrition-related learning; (2) modeling parent- child interactions; and (3) influencing the learners to carry out activities with their children.

This article focuses on the results from two pilot projects that incorporated parenting concepts into nutrition education opportunities designed for limited resource families with young children. It includes (1) brief descriptions of both projects; (2) considerations for successfully integrating parenting content into nutrition education programs; (3) effective strategies for teaching parenting concepts within nutrition education programs; (4) summary of the results; (5) processes that contributed to the outcomes; and (6) the rationale for the importance of the projects.

THE BEGINNING

Proposals were developed in 1992. Collaborators included Cornell Cooperative Extension (CCE) faculty and off-campus educators, NY State Department of Health (NYSDOH) Supplemental Feeding Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) staff, and local WIC staff.

From 1993-1996, the collaborators planned, implemented, and evaluated Building Blocks for Toddlers and Healthy Families and two USDA Cooperative State Research Education and Extension Service (CSREES)funded nutrition projects, using parenting education best practices (Brown, 1998). Both projects addressed that the "neediest" WIC clientele differed in their specific target populations and implementation sites.

The Healthy Families (HF) project participants were pregnant or lactating WIC clients and children of WIC clients through age five. This project was implemented in Delaware, Oneida, and Herkimer counties.

The Building Blocks for Toddlers (BBT) project targeted first-time parents of toddler WIC clients and was implemented in Broome and Tioga counties and in Queens, New York City. The shared objectives of the two projects were that

CCE and the NYSDOH/WIC increase interagency cooperation related to nutrition education.

Graduates report or demonstrate (a) increased knowledge of nutrition, prenatal practices, and infant and toddler practices that contribute to nutritionally sound diets and healthy lifestyles, and (b) increased knowledge of parenting practices that contribute to the development of healthy children.

Graduates report or demonstrate improved behaviors related to diet and lifestyles for themselves and their families in food budgeting and buying; food preparation; food storage, safety, and sanitation; and diet quality.

Both BBT and HF integrated resource management and parenting content with contributions from faculty in Cornell University's Division of Nutritional Sciences, Department of Policy Analysis and Management, and Department of Human Development in the College of Human Ecology. Essential collaborators included a Cornell extension program administrator, an extension assistant for the BBT project, NYSDOH/WIC state and regional staff, off-campus extension educators, and WIC county directors. Paraprofessional educators conducted the nutrition education sessions with the HF project participants. Paraprofessional educators and parent interns delivered the program to BBT project participants.

The initial program delivery approach for BBT was for participants to engage in group learning, supplemented with individualized learning. However, individualized in-home learning with periodic group sessions soon became the primary mode due to timing and transportation difficulties. For HF, individualized in-home learning was the predominant mode because the target areas were rural without access to public transportation. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Integrating Nutrition and Parenting Practices for Young Families: A Report of Two Statewide Projects
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.