PBS Caregiving Program, California Reporter Win Media Awards

By Kleyman, Paul | Aging Today, July/August 2004 | Go to article overview

PBS Caregiving Program, California Reporter Win Media Awards


Kleyman, Paul, Aging Today


The producers of And Thou Shall Honor: Caring for Our Parents, Spouses, and Friends, the PBS special on caregiving in America, and age-beat reporter Nancy Weaver Teichert of The Sacramento Bee won the American Society on Aging's 2004 Media Awards in the national and local-regional categories.

Television producers Harry Wiland and Dale Bell received top national honors for their two-hour PBS special on caregiving in America, And Thou Shall Honor: Caring for Our Parents, Spouses, and Friends, and their continuing educational projects, especially their series of "Caregiving Town Hall Meetings," being held in conjunction with local public-television stations through 2004. First aired in October 2002, And Thou Shall Honor received an exceptional 98% carriage among PBS stations nationwide, and the production team organized 59 national outreach partners who help develop affiliated service programming on many local stations.

MEDIA OUTREACH

Besides the video production, the And Thou Shall Honor project also generated a companion book published by Rodale Press and other outreach. Edited by Pulitzer-nominated author Beth Witrogen McLeod, with a foreword by Rosalynn Carter, the And Thou.Shall Honor book was recently released in a paperback edition. Furthermore, Wiland and Bell-whose family caregiving experience inspired the project-employed an interactive website (www.atsh.org) as part of the And Thou Shah Honor multimedia package, which features a database of 40,000 names of service providers accessible by their zip codes. The project also fostered 12 other caregiving films being offered to more than 100,000 professional organizations with educational support. Wiland and Bell also created the CareGiver Resource Center Video Library.

Wiland is a versatile producer with an Emmy Award-winning career as a television producer and director, as well as a new media innovator in the field of educational multimedia courseware. His projects have ranged from the acclaimed television special Bridge Over Troubled Waters, to his documentaries White Gospel and Earl Scruggs: His Family and Friends.

Bell's wide-ranging career started in the 19603, when he was Martin Scorsese's assistant director on Mean Streets. He later produced Woodstock: The Movie, then moved on to producing or directing documentary productions that have earned an Academy Award, an Emmy and a Peabody Award, among others. Some of his recent works have been California and the Dream seekers for A&E, A Driving Need for PBS, and Chariots of the Gods?: The Mystery Continues for ABC.

HARD NEWS

When an 81 -year-old California man with early-stage dementia stabbed his daughter to death-then did not remember murdering her, Nancy Weaver Teichert, age-beat writer at The Sacramento Bee, wrote a story headlined "A Daughter Lost... But Also a Dad/Experts Cite Need for Improved Diagnoses." The day after an elderly driver killed 10 pedestrians in Santa Monica, Teichert explained in a balanced article on the issue that driving for many elders is "an emotional hot button: A driver's license is a sign of independence and self-sufficiency." In another piece, she showed how poor scrutiny of suspicious deaths in long-term care facilities had allowed homes to cover up crimes and negligent care-was the resident emaciated because of cancer, as claimed, or due to malnutrition? …

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PBS Caregiving Program, California Reporter Win Media Awards
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