Science, Technology and Innovation Policy: Opportunities and Challenges for the Knowledge Economy

Research-Technology Management, March/April 2001 | Go to article overview

Science, Technology and Innovation Policy: Opportunities and Challenges for the Knowledge Economy


Science, Technology and Innovation Policy: Opportunities and Challenges for the Knowledge Economy;

Pedro Conceicao, David V. Gibson, Manual V. Heitor, and Syed Shariq (Eds.); Quorum Books, Westport, CT; 2000; 578 pp., $79.50.

In 1996, The Instituto Superior Technico, Lisbon, Portugal and IC2 Institute, The University of Texas at Austin, working with IC2's Global Research Fellows and partners, initiated a series of international conferences on technology policy and innovation. Key objectives were: (1) the exploration and analysis of unstructured problems using multidisciplinary perspectives for theory-building and application research; (2) Fostering world-class research and practice while helping to close knowledge gaps; (3) Bringing together leading representatives from academia, business and government worldwide to present and discuss current and future issues of critical importance; (4) Providing state-of-the-art and useful knowledge tc decision makers in both the private and public sectors-including informed and effective education, business and government policies and strategies for the global knowledge economy.

This volume presents papers presented at the 1 st International Conference on Technology, Policy and Innovation that was held in Macau, July 2-4, 1997 (Research - Technology Management, Nov.-Dec. 1997, pp. 2-4). The Conference theme was 21 st Century Opportunities and Challenges for Asian Science, Technology, and Innovation Policy. The goal was to present global perspectives and practice on the formation and impact of national and regional science and technology-based systems leading to economic and social development. A total of 179 participants, from 27 countries, contributed 126 papers and 24 invited lectures. Scientists, engineers, managers, entrepreneurs, and policy makers shared knowledge and experiences on the role of science and technology in fostering sustainable economic development and social well-being.

Part I of this volume contains five chapters dealing with the relationship of knowledge and economic development.

Chapter 3 discusses the importance of sharing knowledge across firms and other institutional actors, while Chapter 4 discusses the difficulties of building "knowledge communities" within transnational corporations. The successful integration of knowledge across different sites around the world depends crucially on the management of the integration process.

Chapter 5 argues for the need to actively construct a new disciplinary framework for knowledge management. This disciplinary framework should go beyond being a compass for research and scholarship, and must be used to benefit worldwide development. Therefore, the programmatic agenda within this new discipline should be set by engaging the academic, business and government communities, and research objectives should be to seek immediate applications.

Parts III, IV and V deal with empirical and conceptual studies of national and global pictures on science and technology policies, with Part IV focusing on newly industrialized regions, and Part V focusing exclusively on China. …

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