My Travels with Stan

By Jordan, Lawrence | Millennium Film Journal, Fall 2003 | Go to article overview

My Travels with Stan


Jordan, Lawrence, Millennium Film Journal


We were friends and hung out together in high school (Denver, Colorado). Those were days of high-jinks and intense endeavors. We pushed a drama teacher who preferred teatime comedies into doing Romeo and Juliet. Poor woman-retired the following year.

Our club of intellectual rebels, the GADFLIES (see Aristophanes), drove most of our social relationships at that time. We're talking 1950-1953. We rented Intolerance from the Museum of Modern Art, and got hold of Fireworks from somewhere, also Meshes of the Afternoon.

What I'm saying here is that we got off to a flying start chasing the world of art-primarily, at that time, the classics.

Stan, as I remember, brought in a heavy dose of modernism.

We both quit eastern schools to begin making films (Stan at Dartmouth, I at Harvard). I think we both froze at the thought of a life in academia, or of a four-year's wait before actually doing something in our lives.

Then began a rather difficult time in which young artists were generally referred to as Bohemians and later as Beatniks. But it was an exciting time and formed our real college education.

For a while, our group, which clung together for several years after high school, stayed with classic drama and produced some pretty good one-act plays. Stan was always the director. That was never questioned. He had the energy, the flair, and the extroversion for the role. He seemed to have far-reaching radar for locating people and works in the art world. …

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