The Soviet Strategic Offensive in Manchuria, 1945: "August Storm"/Soviet Operational and Tactical Combat in Manchuria, 1945: "August Storm"

By Van Nederveen, Gilles | Air & Space Power Journal, Fall 2004 | Go to article overview

The Soviet Strategic Offensive in Manchuria, 1945: "August Storm"/Soviet Operational and Tactical Combat in Manchuria, 1945: "August Storm"


Van Nederveen, Gilles, Air & Space Power Journal


The Soviet Strategic Offensive in Manchuria, 1945: "August Storm" by David M. Glantz. Frank Cass Publishers (http://www.frankcass.com), 5824 NE Hassalo Street, Portland, Oregon 97213-3644, 2003, 451 pages, $64.95 (hardcover).

Soviet Operational and Tactical Combat in Manchuria, 1945: "August Storm" by David M. Glantz. Frank Cass Publishers (http://www. frankcass.com), 5824 NE Hassalo Street, Portland, Oregon 97213-3644, 2003, 368 pages, $64.95 (hardcover).

On 9 August 1945, the Soviet army launched a classic double envelopment of Japanese-occupied Manchuria. Col David M. Glantz, US Army, retired, one of the most knowledgeable American historians of Soviet operations during World War II, has again produced a masterpiece. In the more than 800 pages of this two-volume set-the most comprehensive English account of a series of lighting attacks carried out on three axes over a 3,000-mile front-he explains all ground action in the campaign. The operational and tactical volume explores 10 actions in close-up detail. Glantz's description of this campaign as a graduation exercise for the bloodied, battle-hardened Red Army may be the most appropriate label for this relatively unknown operation. Coming on the heels of the atomic blast at Nagasaki, these military operations in mainland Asia have previously attracted little attention from Western military historians.

Records and documentation of the campaign have always been lacking. Japanese records captured by the Red Army in 1945 remain unavailable, and the Russians have only recently opened their archives. Japanese interrogations after 1945 provide a partial picture of operations. Japan occupied Manchuria in 1931; in 1938 and again in 1939, the Japanese Kwangtung army twice tangled with the Soviet army and lost. Both battles showed the Japanese that the Red Army was a formidable foe and may have led the Imperial Japanese Army to push for conquest in Southeast Asia rather than trying to overcome the Soviet Bear in Siberia. The Soviets and Japanese signed a neutrality pact in 1941, which remained in force throughout World War II. Wary of Japanese motives, Stalin maintained about 40 divisions on the Manchurian frontier throughout the war (1941-45), waiting for an opportunity to attack the Japanese.

By 1945 Stalin wished to reestablish Soviet influence in the Pacific region and rail and base rights in Manchuria, as well as consolidate his position in Mongolia. He also wanted to seize the Sakhalin and Kurile Islands from Japan. In April 1945, Stalin abrogated the neutrality pact and commenced a massive redeployment effort that doubled the number of Soviet forces in the Far East to 80 divisions. During the months of May to July 1945, more than 40 divisions were transferred from East Prussia and Czechoslovakia in the heart of Western Europe via the Trans-Siberian Railroad to the Mongolian and Manchurian border areas. In order to maintain security of this operation that saw 22-30 trains a day on the railroad link, most of them moved under cover of darkness. The Soviets maintained deception and surprise by relying heavily on night movement, utilizing assembly areas far removed from the border, and following simple but strict measures such as instructing senior Soviet officers not to wear rank insignia. The 6th Guards Tank Army left all tanks, self-propelled artillery, and vehicles behind in Czechoslovakia, picking up new equipment manufactured by the Soviet Ural factories.

Imperial Japanese Headquarters had withdrawn most formations, including all armor and elite infantry, from the Kwangtung army-at one time numbering over 1 million men-reducing it to a mere shadow of its former self. Thus, the Japanese in Manchuria were forced to alter their defense plans vis-à-vis the Soviet Union. The new 1945 plan called for delaying action along the border and withdrawal to prepared defensive lines and then to a stronghold area in southeastern Manchuria for the final defensive action. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

The Soviet Strategic Offensive in Manchuria, 1945: "August Storm"/Soviet Operational and Tactical Combat in Manchuria, 1945: "August Storm"
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.