Tannenberg and after. Lithuania, Poland, and the Teutonic Order in Search of Immortality

By Knoll, Paul W. | The Catholic Historical Review, July 2004 | Go to article overview

Tannenberg and after. Lithuania, Poland, and the Teutonic Order in Search of Immortality


Knoll, Paul W., The Catholic Historical Review


Tannenberg and After. Lithuania, Poland, and the Teutonic Order in Search of Immortality. By William Urban. (Chicago: Lithuanian Research and Studies Center. 1999. Pp. xxxii, 500. $38.50 paperback.)

For more than three decades, Urban has devoted himself to the study of Baltic history, publishing, among other volumes, studies of the medieval crusade in the Baltic, in Prussia, in Livonia, and in Samogitia. This book is conceived as a sequel to these and focuses upon the major states and personalities in the region during the decades from the late fourteenth through the early sixteenth century. While the peoples and leaders of Poland and Lithuania are important in his story, it is the Knights of the Teutonic Order who figure most prominently (and are the focus of a more recent book by him). Readers familiar with Urban's previous scholarship will recognize his approach, which stands firmly in the camp of traditional narrative political history. As such, it represents a welcome treatment, rich with detail and vivid images, of a region and period not well studied in anglophone scholarship.

Following a brief introduction to set the late fourteenth-century context, Urban treats the rivalry between the cousins Grand Duke Vytautas of Lithuania and King Wladyslaw Jagietlo of Poland, the Teutonic Order's crusade against piracy in the Baltic, and the revolt in Samogitia that eventually brought Poland, Lithuania, and the Teutonic Knights to the eve of war. That conflict, including the battle of Tannenberg, and the subsequent inconclusive campaign are the subjects of the next two chapters. Urban then shifts his focus to the Council of Constance, where the conflict between the three Baltic parties was played out, then returns to relations between Vytautas and Jagieito. A chapter on the Hussite problem and how it affected Polish relations with the Order and vice versa leads into a relatively brief treatment of the Thirteen Years' War from 1454 to 1466 and the effective solution to relations between the Teutonic Order and Poland-Lithuania. The penultimate chapter examines the decades thereafter, during which the Order sought unsuccessfully to reform itself and to avoid at almost any cost formalizing its subjection to Poland. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Tannenberg and after. Lithuania, Poland, and the Teutonic Order in Search of Immortality
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.