Registres Du Consistoire De Genève Au Temps De Calvin, Tome II (1545-1546)

By Monter, William | The Catholic Historical Review, July 2004 | Go to article overview

Registres Du Consistoire De Genève Au Temps De Calvin, Tome II (1545-1546)


Monter, William, The Catholic Historical Review


Registres du Consistoire de Genève au temps de Calvin, Tome II (1545-1546). Edited by Thomas A. Lambert, Isabella M. Watt, and Wallace McDonald under the direction of Robert M. Kingdon. [Travaux d'Humanisme et Renaissance, No. CCCLII.] (Geneva: Librairie Droz. 2001. Pp. xxx, 416.)

If the first volume of this impressive series documented the Genevan Consistory's abrupt shift from matrimonial court to early instrument of confessionalization,' its successor (following a lacuna of over a year) illustrates how it overcame some early challenges to its authority. The materials from October, 1545, through December, 1546, still contain several vestiges of the Consistory's struggle against Catholic practices: some Genevan residents continued to recite Latin prayers, especially the Ave Maria (pp. 82, 89, 149, 207, 251), and Genevans still sold such relics of ydollatrie as wax candles (p. 287) or Paternosters (p. 315). One old artisan, a citizen of Geneva for a quarter-century, told the Consistory that "he was still the way he was thirty years ago" (p. 93). Other Genevans occasionally visited their emigré nuns in Savoy (p. 285); more of them still made pilgrimages to the regional shrine of St. Claude (pp. 87, 95, 317, 321). This latter custom led to a scandal in August, 1546, when two women re-baptized a child "Claude" after the pastor had specifically refused the parental request and named him "Abraham" (pp. 271f., 279f.).

By 1546, the most frequent items of business before Calvin's Consistory (it was indeed Calvin's: he attended almost every meeting and was often the only pastor present) involved fornication and its consequences; one exceptional case, involving one woman and forty-six men, merits an appendix (pp. 371-378). But this tribunal also began to investigate magical superstitions (pp. 65, 66, 107, 141, 166, 261), including a "familiar devil" in a mandragola root (p. 86). One finds trace elements of such other mid-1540's religious issues as Anabaptism (p. 14), the massacre of Waldensians in Provence (p. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Registres Du Consistoire De Genève Au Temps De Calvin, Tome II (1545-1546)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.