Tyranny under the Mantle of St Peter: Pope Paul II and Bologna

By Lee, Egmont | The Catholic Historical Review, July 2004 | Go to article overview

Tyranny under the Mantle of St Peter: Pope Paul II and Bologna


Lee, Egmont, The Catholic Historical Review


Tyranny under the Mantle of St Peter: Pope Paul II and Bologna. By Ian Robertson. [Late Medieval and Early Modern Studies (formerly Binghamton Medieval and Early Modern Studies), Volume 5.] (Turnhout: Brepols Publishers N.V 2002. Pp. x, 245. euro55.00.)

This book makes a solid contribution to understanding political realities that have long intrigued historians of late medieval Italy. Its focus is on Bologna, the second city in the Papal States, during a particularly intricate phase of the city's relationship with its distant overlord. In a less direct way Robertson also sheds light on problems faced by many other communes, beset as they were by conflict between families, factions, and sometimes individuals, all aspiring to power beyond that of their rivals. He also adds valuable insights into the nature, and the limits, of the papacy's secular power in governing a modestly sized but intractable territorial state.

While the book has more general implications, Robertson never strays far from the topic to which his title makes reference ,Paul II's refusal to see "tyrannies "flourish "under the mantle of St. Peter." In the case of Bologna, Robertson argues, the tyranny in question was not that of the Bentivoglio, but of the oligarchic Council of Sixteen, of which the Bentivoglio were members, but which they did not necessarily control. The first half of the book at times reads as a sustained explication du texte, based on the report of a Milanese ambassador to whom the pope had expressed his reservations about how the Sixteen exploited their position of power. Membership in the Council was reserved for an exclusive group and had come to be for life, even hereditary; members used public funds for their private purposes, and they abused the power of the Council by securing lucrative appointments for their relatives and friends. Robertson here quotes from the documents which he takes to express the Pope's views and then goes on to assess their justification by drawing on a very broad range of evidence (archival records, manuscript sources, and an extensive bibliography of published works). He concludes, on balance, that Paul's objections were generally well founded and, perhaps surprisingly, given the number of disaffected informants, based on accurate intelligence.

The second half of the volume focuses on a drawn-out tug-of-war between Paul II and Bologna, ostensibly over the renewal of chapters (capitula) in which Nicholas V had guaranteed the city's privileges. Pope and city clashed over a small number of issues concerning taxation, and most important, the composition of the Sixteen and the term for which its members held office. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Tyranny under the Mantle of St Peter: Pope Paul II and Bologna
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.