The Passion of Abby Hemenway: Memory, Spirit, and the Making of History

By Campbell, Debra | The Catholic Historical Review, July 2004 | Go to article overview

The Passion of Abby Hemenway: Memory, Spirit, and the Making of History


Campbell, Debra, The Catholic Historical Review


The Passion of Abby Hemenway: Memory, Spirit, and the Making of History. By Deborah Pickman Clifford. (Montpelier: Vermont Historical Society. Distributed by University Press of New England, Hanover. 2001. Pp. x, 350. $40.00 cloth; $24.95 paperback.)

The name Abby Hemenway is not a household word among Catholic historians, and that is no surprise. During her lifetime Hemenway (1828-1890) was best known as a regional historian, editor of the Vermont Historical Gazeteer, a multi-volume work in which Hemenway sought to include a history of every Vermont village and town. This ambitious project consumed most of her energies and all of her resources from age thirty-one until she died at sixty-one, alone in Chicago where she had fled in 1885 to escape mounting financial troubles connected with the Gazeteer.

Although Clifford focuses attention upon Hemenway's career as editor of the Gazeteer, she also covers terrain that is of great interest to Catholic historians. In April, 1864, Hemenway, a member of the Ludlow Baptist church since 1843, was received into the Roman Catholic Church in Burlington, Vermont. Hemenway, who had written "The Mystical Rose," a poem reflecting upon the life of the Virgin Mary, even before her conversion, soon became known in Catholic literary circles, and reached out to other well-known literary converts with New England roots, including Orestes Brownson and Eliza Allen Starr. Her devotional poetry caught the attention of Father Edward Sorin of the University of Notre Dame, editor of the newly established Catholic weekly Ave Maria. Mother Angela Gillespie of St. Mary's Academy, Notre Dame, provided spiritual support and hired her to teach Latin during the spring term of 1880. Hemenway stayed with the Holy Cross Sisters at Notre Dame more than once, and also boarded at the Sacred Heart convent in Burlington, Vermont. …

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