Personal Privacy in a Technological Society

Journal of Family and Consumer Sciences, January 1, 2001 | Go to article overview

Personal Privacy in a Technological Society


Trends, forecasts, and images of the future

Privacy is eroded through technology; and there are steps to take to stop the invasion.

There are countless ways to begin the preservation of personal privacy:

* Express concerns directly to businesses and to legislators who are developing privacy laws;

* Check your credit report for accuracy and to remove your name from credit bureau mailing lists;

* Guard your social security number;

* Shred or tear-up unneeded documents containing personal information;

* Never give sensitive information over a cellular or cordless phone;

* Obtain your medical file from the Medical Information Bureau (MIB) at www.mib.com;

* Access the article Medical Record Privacy, by Dr. Mary Ellen Rider, at http://chrfs.unl.edu/rider.htm;

* Limit the information you provide on rebates, contests, and warranties;

* Look for Better Business Bureau approval seals for online shopping, http://www.bbbonline.org;

* Be cautious about sharing personal information at work - your employer has the right to go through or check everything;

* Ensure that your computer and the computer you are accessing have a secure browser;

* Guard your passwords - combine letters and numbers;

* Read online privacy policies for sites you visit;

* Use established businesses online;

* Print out terms of transactions;

* Pay with a credit card. …

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