Internet Safety and Children

Journal of Family and Consumer Sciences, January 1, 2001 | Go to article overview

Internet Safety and Children


Most parents have spoken to their children about how to deal with strangers and what television shows, movies, and videos are appropriate to watch. Some parents, however, have not spoken to their children about strangers on the Internet or about the content of the Internet. Though the Internet can be a useful educational tool, some users are manipulative, rude, dishonest, or even criminal, seeking out those who are vulnerable and unfamiliar with the Internet. It can be useful for parents to speak with their children about the Internet and to set up rules governing its use. The following advice for parents is adapted from The U.S. Department of Education publication: A Parent's Guide to the Internet:

Never give out personal information, including name, address, phone number, age, race, family income, school name or location, and friends' names, or use a credit card online without parental permission.

Never share Internet passwords, even with friends.

Never arrange a meeting with someone you meet online.

Never respond to messages that are confusing or uncomfortable. Ignore the sender, end communication, and tell a trusted adult right away.

Never use bad language or send mean messages online. Remember that people you meet online are not always who they say they are.

Even without trying, children can come across Internet material that is obscene, pornographic, violent, or racist. This content can be quite offensive, but it is legal. Child pornography, however, is illegal. If a child comes across this type of material it is important to contact the Center for Missing and Exploited Children at 1-800-THE LOST or at http:// www.missingkids.org/. To help keep offensive Internet material away from children:

Ensure that children understand what is appropriate and inappropriate material. Which sites are okay to visit and which ones are not?

Be aware of downloaded or copied games. Some contain violent or sexual content, which may be inappropriate for some children.

Look into software that filters out offensive Internet materials and sites. For information contact Cyber-Sitter (http://www.cybersitter.com), Cyber-Snoop (http://www.peralsw.com), or Net Nanny (http://www.netnanny.com). Children are often smart enough to get around the restrictions these products provide. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Internet Safety and Children
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.