Accreditation Views

By Crouse, Joyce S. | Journal of Family and Consumer Sciences, January 1, 2001 | Go to article overview

Accreditation Views


Crouse, Joyce S., Journal of Family and Consumer Sciences


ACCREDITATION HIGHLIGHTS

The Council for Accreditation has been busy working on two critically important initiatives that are important to AAFCS!

The AAFCS Council for Accreditation has completed and submitted its self-study in application for recognition by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation. The Association's accreditation program began in 1968 and was recognized by the Commission on Postsecondary Accreditation and subsequently by the Commission on Recognition of Postsecondary Accreditation. The Council's efforts to become recognized by CHEA will continue through 2002.

The work on the Body of Knowledge has progressed to the point where the information and decisions are now being incorporated into Standard 3 of the Accreditation Document. The Document has been revised and will be reprinted this spring with copies going to all accredited units. Following is a draft of the proposed revision to Standard 3:

STANDARD 3: PROGRAM FOUNDATIONS

INTRODUCTION

Programs in family and consumer sciences prepare professionals to be competent to assume leadership roles in education, business, and the public and private sectors that focus on support of individuals, families, consumers, and communities in contemporary society. Programs are to include content to provide breadth of general education and depth of study. Also, programs are to facilitate the application of the common body of knowledge to support the process of seeking solutions to complex individual, family, consumer, and community issues.

The common body of knowledge of family and consumer sciences includes unique concepts that integrate the study of individuals, families, and communities through human systems theory and life course development. Understanding human systems theory is fundamental to addressing basic human needs and links these concepts to application. This is the core knowledge base of all graduates of family and consumer sciences programs. Graduates shall have the ability to apply these concepts to professional practice.

The unique concepts that support the common body of knowledge may include the content from the study of human/family development over the life course; resource management; wellness, food, and human nutrition; apparel and textiles, shelter, and design of the near environment. Contemporary family and consumer sciences baccalaureate programs provide options to function in society as a generalist, requiring an integrative focus using the concepts described. Additionally, professionals may function as specialists, requiring both considerable depth in one content area and the ability to integrate concepts from other areas to the development of individuals, families, consumers, and communities.

3.1 INTENT: Students understand the synergistic, integrative nature of the family and consumer sciences profession with its focus on the interrelationships among individuals, families, consumers, and communities as taught in human systems theory and life course development and students apply this understanding to the study of their areas of specialization.

Criteria

3.1 (1) Faculty from each content area have input into the development of the common learning objectives for all family and consumer sciences majors.

3.1 (2) Each program offered by the unit contributes to the integrative focus.

a. Through their study of human systems theory and life course development, students understand the interaction and interrelatedness of individuals, families, consumers, and communities.

b. Students understand the dynamics of capacity building of individuals within families, communities, work environments, and other contexts.

c. Students apply knowledge from their programs of study to the issues of individuals, families, consumers, and communities in the environments in which they function to enable the wellness of those entities. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Accreditation Views
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.