Books Received/livers Recus

Resources for Feminist Research, Winter 2002 | Go to article overview

Books Received/livers Recus


Allen, Carolyn and Judith A. Howard, eds. Provoking Feminisms. Chicago and London: The University of Chicago Press, 2000.

Angelides, Steven. A History of Bisexuality. Chicago and London: The University of Chicago Press, 2001.

Baker, Maureen. Families, Labour and Love: Family Diversity in a Changing World. Vancouver: University of British Colombia Press, 2001.

Bannerji, Himani, Shahrzad Mojab and Judith Whitehead, eds. Of Property and Propriety: The Role of Gender and Class in Imperialism and Nationalism. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2001.

Beaulieu, Frances. Little Buffalo River. (Short Stories.) Toronto: McGilligan Books, 2001.

Bertrand-Jennings, Chantal. D'un siecle a l'autre. Romans de Claire de Duras. Jaignes, La Chasse au SNARK, 2001.

Brenner, Johanna. Women and the Politics of Class. New York: Monthly Review Press, 2001.

Brockman, Joan. Gender in the Legal Profession: Fitting or Breaking the Mould. Vancouver: University of British Colombia, 2001.

Bueler, Lois E. The Tested Woman Pilot: Women's Choices, Men's Judgements, and the Shaping of Stories. Chicago: The Ohio State University Press, 2001.

Buss, Helen M., D.L. Macdonald and Anne McWhir, eds. Mary Wollstoncraft and Mary Shelley: Writing Lives. Waterloo, ON: Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 2001.

Carroll, Susan J. The Impact of Women in Public Office. Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press, 2001.

Chanter, Tina. Time, Death and the Feminine: Levinas with Heidegger. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2001.

Christie, Christine. Gender and Language: Towards a Feminist Pragmatics. New York: Columbia University Press, 2001.

Covell, Katherine and R. Brian Howe. The Challenge of Children's Rights for Canada. Waterloo, ON: Wilfrid University Press, 2001.

Creager, Angela N.H., Elizabeth Lunbeck and Londa Schiebinger, eds. Feminism in Twentieth-Century Science, Technology, and Medicine. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2002.

Dagg, Anne Innis. The Feminine Gaze: A Canadian Compendium of Non-Fiction Women Authors and Their Books, 1836-1945. Waterloo, ON: Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 2001.

Dean, Tim and Christopher Lane, eds. Homosexuality and Psychoanalysis. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2001.

Etzkowitz, Henry, Carol Kemelgor and Brian Uzzi. Athena Unbound: The Advancement of Women in Science and Technology. New York/Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2000.

Erem, Suzan. Labor Pains: Inside America's New Union Movement. New York: Monthly Review Press, 2001.

Freeman, Barbara M. The Satellite Sex: The Media and Women's Issues in English Canada, 1966-1971. Waterloo, Ontario: Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 2001.

Garber, Linda. Identity Poetics: Race, Class, and the Lesbian-Feminist Roots of Queer Theory. New York: Columbia University Press, 2001.

Gerhard, Jane. Desiring Revolution: Second-Wave Feminism and the Rewriting of Twentieth-Century American Sexual Thought, 1920 to 1982. New York: Columbia University Press, 2001.

Goddard, Victoria Ana, ed. Gender, Agency and Change: Anthropological Perspectives. New York: Routledge, 2000.

Gurnstein, Penny. Wired to the World/Chained to the Home: Telework in Daily Life. Vancouver and Toronto: University of British Columbia Press, 2001.

Hannah-Moffat, Kelly. Punishment in Disguise: Penal Governance and Federal Imprisonment of Women in Canada. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2001.

Holsinger, Bruce W. Music, Body and Desire in Medieval Culture: Hildegard of Bingen to Chaucer. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2001.

Hoving, Isabel. In Praise of New Travelers: Reading Caribbean Migrant Women's Writing. Standford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2001.

Hoy, Helen. How Should I Read These?: Native Women Writers in Canada. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2001. …

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