New Faces at Council

Humanities, March/April 2001 | Go to article overview

New Faces at Council


MAKING THEIR FIRST APPEARANCE AT THE NATIONAL COUNCIL ON THE HUMANITIES IN MARCH ARE NINE MEMBERS WHO WERE APPOINTED DURING THE CONGRESSIONAL RECESS. THE COUNCIL IS THE TWENTY-SIX-MEMBER ADVISORY GROUP THAT MAKES FUNDING AND POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS TO THE CHAIRMAN OF THE NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES. HERE'S A LOOK AT THE NEW ADDITIONS TO THE NEH FAMILY.

NINA M. ARCHABAL, from St. Paul, Minnesota, is the director and state historic preservation officer of the Minnesota Historical Society. She is a recipient of the National Humanities Medal and has sat on the boards for the American Folklife Center and the Overseers of Harvard College.

BETTY G, BENGSTON is director of the University Libraries at the University of Washington in Seattle. She served as president of the Association of Research Libraries from 1998 through 1999, and has worked with the Library and Information Technology Association, the Washington Library Association, and the Council on Library and Information Resources.

RON CHEW, from Seattle, is executive director of the Wing Luke Asian Museum. He has turned his background in journalism into a tool for curatorial communication and was the exhibition writer for several projects at the museum, including "Twenty Years after the Fall of Saigon: The Vietnamese American Story." Chew is the recipient of several awards including the Governor's Heritage Award from the Washington State Arts Commission.

BILL DUKE of Washington, D.C., is chairman of the film studies at Howard University, and has had a career as a film director and actor. His directing credits include the films The Boy who Painted Christ Black and Sister Act Tvvo: Back in the Habit, as well as the television programs Raisin in the Sun and Hill Street Blues. His film Hoodlum received spacial recognition from Friends of the Black Oscar Nominees and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

DONALD L FIXICO, from Baldwin City, Kansas, is professor of history and director of the Indigenous Nations Studies Graduate Program at the Universty of Kansas, and has taught at universities in England and Germany. Among his publications are Termination and Relocation: Federal Indian Policy, 1945-1960, Urban Indians, and The Invasion of Indian Country in the Twentieth Century: Amencan Capitalism and Tribal Natural Resources. …

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