Investing in People: The Secret to Success in the Global War on Terrorism

By Brown, Reginald J. | Army, October 2004 | Go to article overview

Investing in People: The Secret to Success in the Global War on Terrorism


Brown, Reginald J., Army


The requirements of the global war on terrorism and ongoing efforts to transform the military personnel system have presented the Army with unique opportunities for innovative change. The Acting secretary of the Army and the Army Chief of Staff have seized these opportunities to initiate a series of groundbreaking Transformation efforts. This series of important initiatives will eventually transform the Army personnel system and its organizational structure. Unit modularity force stabilization, active component/reserve component (AC/RC) rebalancing, and military-to-civilian job conversions are all playing key roles in the ongoing transformation of the Army personnel system.

The Office of Manpower and Reserve Affairs (M&RA) has helped to support and sustain a deployment process that has seen more than 90 percent of the Army's active component maneuver brigades deployed to combat, and has helped manage a mobilization system that has seen more than 350,000 members of the reserve components mobilized and deployed around the world. July 2004 alone found more than 140,000 of these citizen-soldiers answering the call in Iraq, Afghanistan, the Philippines, Bosnia, Kosovo and more than 70 other countries worldwide.

In implementing mobilization, M&RA has undertaken a number of systemic improvements. We have refined the alert and mobilization process, eased restrictions on the promotion of mobilized reservists and improved the timeliness and quality of medical care received by reserve component personnel.

M&RA has insisted upon timely notification of alert and mobilization of reserve component units. Units being mobilized are being given the maximum notice whenever possible. For example, many of the units scheduled to deploy in early 2005 have already been notified.

Efforts to improve reserve component personnel management during mobilization have required a great deal of time and attention, but these efforts have not impeded the determination to continue the Transformation of the Army. Among M&RA Transformation efforts are AC/RC rebalancing and modularity. These initiatives will result in significant changes in the structure arid composition of both the active and reserve components in the years to come.

The most important result of AC/RC rebalancing will be a shift away from a force structure based on Cold War expectations to one more responsive to the asymmetric needs of the current threat environment. Specialties such as Civil Affairs, Psychological Operations and Military Police will figure more prominently in the active component force structure, while the reserve components may find themselves fielding additional heavier forces.

Complementing the AC/RC rebalancing effort are a series of wholesale structural changes that, collectively, fall under a new initiative called "modularity." This concept is a cornerstone of the Army's overall Transformation strategy. It will transform Army forces into organizations that are more flexible, sustainable and strategically responsive. One very visible aspect of the modularity effort will be an increase in active component combat brigades from 33 to 43 in the coming years, an effort that is already under way, with three new brigade combat teams forming in fiscal year (FY) 2004. The authorized temporary increase in Army strength from 482,400 to 512,400 will provide the needed flexibility to make this new force structure vision a reality. The result will be an expanded force, well on the way to transforming in both function and in nomenclature. A less visible outcome will be greater cohesion among military personnel, among their families and in the communities in which they serve.

Another important initiative, force stabilization, promises to shift the Army's historical approach to manpower management from a system based on individuals to one focused on units. This initiative will dramatically increase the effectiveness and cohesion of the force through unitcentric manning. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Investing in People: The Secret to Success in the Global War on Terrorism
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.