Antiarmor Weapons


In addition to the programs managed by its Aviation Rockets and Missiles Project Office (included in the Aircraft section) and Precision Fires Project Offices (included in the Field Artillery and Mortars section), Program Executive Office (PEO), Tactical Missiles manages a range of close combat and non-line-of-sight systems supporting both Current Force warfighter needs and Future Force requirements.

Close combat weapons systems, for example, include the tube-launched, optically tracked, wire-guided (TOW) family of missile systems, the Javelin manportable antitank system, and the lme-ofsight antitank (LOSAT) kinetic energy missile system. The TOW and Javelin systems were major contributors to the successful outcome of Operation Iraqi Freedom. The LOSAT will be the Army's first fielded kinetic energy missile system and is providing the technological groundwork for future kinetic energy missile systems such as the compact kinetic energy missile (CKEM).

The Tube-Launched, Optically Tracked, Wire-Guided (TOW) Missile System is a long-range heavy antitank system designed to attack and defeat armored vehicles and other targets, such as field fortifications. The battalion-level weapon system is mounted on various platforms including the Bradley fighting vehicle, the improved TOW vehicle, the Humvee and the AH-IF Cobra helicopter. In addition, it can be operated in a dismounted ground mode.

The TOW missile system consists of a tripod, traversing unit, missile guidance set, launch tube, optical sight, battery assembly and any of five missile variations. The TOW missile system also includes a thermal sight that provides a capability for operations at night, in reduced visibility and in a countermeasure environment. TOW missiles are all up-rounds encased in a disposable container.

The TOW weapon system entered its production and deployment phase with the basic TOW in 1970. Since then, multiple variations of the missile and the TOW subsystem have been fielded. Operation Desert Storm, for example, saw extensive use of the TOW 2A missile while OIF saw significant use of TOW 2B, with varying estimates indicating that somewhere between 1,000 and 2,000 missiles were fired during the most recent conflict.

Two recent developments within the TOW missile family include the modification of several hundred missiles to a "bunker buster" warhead configuration (for use by the Stryker brigade combat teams before the fielding of their mobile gun system variants) and the introduction of the TOW 2B AERO, an extended range (four and one-half plus kilometer) version of the TOW missile.

The Javelin is a manportable antitank system developed for the Army and Marine Corps. It replaces the Dragon antiarmor missile system. Javelin provides a medium-range antitank capability to infantry, scouts and combat engineers. The system is lethal against tanks with conventional and reactive armor.

The Javelin has two major tactical components: a reusable command launch unit (CLU) and a missile sealed in a disposable launch tube assembly. The CLU incorporates an integrated day/night sight and provides target engagement capability in adverse weather and countermeasure environments. The CLU may also be used in the stand-alone mode for battlefield surveillance and target detection.

The Javelin system weighs 49 pounds, and its maximum range is more than 2,500 meters. The Javelin's key technical feature is the use of fire-and-forget technology that allows the gunner to fire and immediately take cover. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Antiarmor Weapons
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.