Digital Battle Command


COMMAND, CONTROL, COMMUNICATIONS, COMPUTERS AND INTELLIGENCE (C^sup 4^I) SYSTEMS

U.S. Army C^sup 4^I programs and activities are the foundation for tactical digitization and service operations in the 21st century. The Army organizations with responsibilities to acquire, develop and sustain C^sup 4^I systems include the U.S. Army Communications-Electronics Command, the Communications Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center and the following program executive offices (PEOs): PEO Command, Control and Communications-Tactical; PEO Intelligence, Electronic Warfare and Sensors, and PEO Enterprise Information Systems.

These organizations provide and sustain advanced digital and electronic systems that support various mission areas in the tactical environment, including digital battle command, platforms and hardware support, C^sup 4^ support to air and missile defense, C^sup 4^ support to network operations, C^sup 4^ support to effects and fires, C^sup 4^ support to intelligence operations, sensors and sensor systems, night-vision systems and devices, tactical radios and satellite communications systems.

The organizations also are responsible for the integration of digital and electronic systems to provide information to the right warfighter at the right time in the joint environment to increase the speed and lethality of operations for the Current Force and in support of Transformation.

The Army Battle Command System (ABCS) is an integrated family of command and control systems being directed by the program executive office (PEO) for Command, Control and Communications Systems-Tactical. Digital battlefield operating systems being developed and fielded under the ABCS umbrella include: advanced field artillery tactical data system (AFATDS); air and missile defense workstation (AMDWS); all-source analysis system (ASAS); battle command sustainment support system (BCS^sup 3^); digital topographic support system; enhanced position location reporting system (EPLRS); Force XXI battle command brigade and below (FBCB2); global command and control systemArmy (GCCS-A) and maneuver control system (MCS). …

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