Towed Howitzers


Designed for conditions encountered during the Vietnam conflict, the M102 105 mm Towed Howitzer was first fielded to 1-21 Field Artillery, 9th Light Infantry Division in Vietnam in 1966. It is a highly versatile weapon system with a maximum range of 11,500 meters.

Nearly one ton lighter than the World War II-era MlOlAl 105 mm towed howitzer (4,980 pounds) that it replaced, the M102 (3,338 pounds) proved to be a highly versatile weapon.

Most Ml 02 systems have been replaced by the M119A1/A2 105 mm towed howitzer. Over 200 remain in service with the Army National Guard (ARNG). In 2004, ARNG M102s were deployed to Iraq. There are 10 Army National Guard battalions that field the M102. Currently the Army is considering equipping active duty units with the M102.

The M119A1 105 mm Towed Howitzer was first issued to the U.S. Army's 7th Infantry Division (Light) in December 1989. Transportable by UH-60 helicopters, the lightweight, towed field artillery system (4,520 pounds including BII, 4,100 without) provided significantly greater range (14,000 meters standard, 19,500 high-explosive rocket-assisted) and lethality than the MlOlAl/M102 105 mm towed howitzers that it replaced in a variety of light units.

Based on the LH 8 British light gun, the M119Als provided to U.S. units were modified with U.S. fire control, a cannon assembly able to fire U.S. 105 mm ammunition (vice the British electrically fired Abbot ammunition) and the addition of brackets to incorporate a chronograph and battery computer system. A series of upgrades to the basic M119A1 has resulted in a redesignation of M119A2 for these modernized howitzers.

To provide even greater range and lethality for light-unit fire-support elements, the Army began fielding the M198 155 mm Towed Howitzer in early 1979. As a successor to the older M114A1 155 mm towed system, the 15,750-pound (original fielded weight) M198 provided a maximum range of 30 kilometers (with rocket-assisted projectiles) and the capability to fire a broader range of ammunition options than those available for 105 mm units.

Normally towed by a 5-ton truck, the M198 can also be moved by a CH-47D Chinook helicopter or Air Force assets, C-130 and larger.

The M777/M777A1 Lightweight 155 mm Howitzer (LW155) is a joint Marine Corps and Army program to replace the M198 155 mm towed howitzer. The LW155 will be a general support system for the Army's light units, and direct-support cannon fire-support system for the Stryker brigade combat team. It will be the sole howitzer in the Marine Corps.

Its key performance parameters are a howitzer weight of less than 10,000 pounds, emplacement time of two to three minutes and a displacement time of one to two minutes. The LW155 uses the M776 155 mm cannon, giving it a maximum firing range of approximately 30 kilometers with rocket-assisted projectiles and 24.7 kilometers with standard rounds. It has a maximum firing rate of four rounds per minute and a sustained rate of two rounds per minute.

The first engineering manufacturing and development (EMD) LWl 55 was delivered to the government in June 2000. A total of eight EMD and two pilot production howitzers have since been delivered and undergone technical tests.

After a joint Army-Marine operational assessment in 2002, in November 2002 the Marine Corps was given permission to begin low rate production of the basic M777 howitzer. The first production howitzer was delivered in February 2004. The USMC will begin fielding a total of 94 M777s in January 2005.

The M777E1 is a test version of the M777 fitted with on-board electronics, giving it similar self-locating, self-laying and digital communications as the M109A6 Paladin. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Towed Howitzers
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.