Time for Tennyson

By Boone, James; Finnegan, Lora J. | Sunset, November 2004 | Go to article overview

Time for Tennyson


Boone, James, Finnegan, Lora J., Sunset


Stroll and shop in the heart of Denver's Berkeley Park

In 1995, when Denver's Elitch Gardens left its Tennyson Street and West 38th Avenue site and moved downtown, you could almost see the area start to fade. But as young families began moving into the Berkeley Park neighborhood's affordable bungalows, Tennyson started its comeback. "It's turning around and full of energy," says Briana Gonzales, owner of housewares shop Sweet Potato. Tennyson is no Cherry Creek yet, but its lively mix of galleries plus toy, folk-art, and home stores is perfect for a preholiday afternoon of shopping.

Start out at Lisa Marie's Coffee & Tea House (4418 Tennyson St.; 303/433-2344), where you can nibble a giant cinnamon roll with your white caramel-turtle latte. For a dose of color on a late-autumn day, step into Indigena Gallery (closed Sun-Mon; 4320 Tennyson; 720/855-8282), loaded with international folk art. At cheery Sweet Potato (dosed Sun; 4370 Tennyson; 303/458-1076), you'll find stylish bedding, cookware, glassware, and garden gifts.

Take the kids to Studio Bini (4366 Tennyson; 303/ 477-3227) to choose from a clever mix of classic wood toys and puzzles, furniture, and cool clothes, some designed by co-owner Linde Schlumbohm. Or nurture your own inner child with a visit to the Yankee Trader (4000 Tennyson; 303/480-1132), a kingdom of antique toys (pedal cars, cap guns, train sets) in a building datine from the 1930s. …

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