Reviews -- the Schoolhouse Door: Segregation's Last Stand at the University of Alabama by E. Culpepper Clark

By Archer, Chalmers, Jr. | The Journal of Negro Education, Winter 1994 | Go to article overview

Reviews -- the Schoolhouse Door: Segregation's Last Stand at the University of Alabama by E. Culpepper Clark


Archer, Chalmers, Jr., The Journal of Negro Education


The author's primary objective in The Schoolhouse Door is to provide a detailed report of an incident that took place on June 11, 1963. On that date, Alabama Governor George C. Wallace physically blocked the entrance to Foster Auditorium on the campus of the University of Alabama (UA) to prevent Vivian Malone and James Hood from becoming the first Black students to enroll successfully at that institution. Wallace personally resisted their entry in direct defiance of Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach, who, along with federal troops, was sent on behalf of the Kennedy Administration to force Alabama to accept court-ordered desegregation. While this particular episode, as a civil rights activity, was somewhat less dramatic than similar conflicts in other places in the South, the memory of "segregation's last stand" lingers in the minds of most Americans. It was an event that marked a particularly salient moment in modem American history, and one that gave the nation an unforgettable and powerful symbol of the struggle for racial justice. It also huned the University of Alabama into a proving ground for the civil rights movement.

Clark's efforts to relate the direness of the racial situation in the segregated South during the period leading up to the incident at the schoolhouse door, specifically that from 1952 to 1963, are laudable. Drawing upon both interviews and official records, he describes several events that preceded that fateful day in June 1963. He revives the stories of the many brave Black applicants who preceded Malone and Hood and of the hateful demonstrators and powerful politicians who defied their efforts. This includes, for example, the unsung and poorly organized attempt by civil rights workers to facilitate the cases of Autherine Lucy and Pollie Anne Myers, who applied for admission to UA in 1952. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Reviews -- the Schoolhouse Door: Segregation's Last Stand at the University of Alabama by E. Culpepper Clark
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.