Book Reviews -- Silent Sons by Robert J. Ackerman

By Beck, Robert L. | American Journal of Psychotherapy, Summer 1994 | Go to article overview

Book Reviews -- Silent Sons by Robert J. Ackerman


Beck, Robert L., American Journal of Psychotherapy


ROBERT J. ACKERMAN: Silent Sons. Simon and Schuster, New York, 1993, 235 pp., $21.00.

As the men's movement passed me by, and my copy of Robert Bly's Iron John has not yet been cracked, I am either the least or most qualified to review Dr. Ackerman's Silent Sons. His "silent sons" are men who grew up in dysfunctional families yet deny the impact of this experience on their current behavior regardless of the problems it causes those around them. He acknowledges that the fact that he, himself, is a silent son, prompted his conducting a study of these men. Ackerman describes the silent son as, in a nutshell, withdrawn, angry, and vulnerable. He suggests that while they do indeed present as inaccessible and unrelatable, they in fact carry positive characteristics that may be tapped in their interaction with others.

As a male reader proceeds through this popularly paced book, he may see himself as sharing the characteristics Ackerman ascribes to the emotionally inaccessible man of today. In his first chapter, Ackerman asks, "Are you a silent son?" The answer might be: "Sure...show me a man who isn't," or who does not embrace the characteristics described by the author.

This book is briskly written and moves the reader along a path of self-identification of the silent-son syndrome. Ackerman takes care not to indict newly sprung silent sons by noting heir assets or at least, reframing their less functional behaviors. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Book Reviews -- Silent Sons by Robert J. Ackerman
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.