Book Reviews -- Lynching in the New South: Georgia and Virginia, 1880-1930 (Blacks in the New World Series) by W. Fitzhugh Brundage

By Hamm, Richard F. | The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, April 1994 | Go to article overview

Book Reviews -- Lynching in the New South: Georgia and Virginia, 1880-1930 (Blacks in the New World Series) by W. Fitzhugh Brundage


Hamm, Richard F., The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography


This comparative history of lynching in two states is a sophisticated examination of "the most Southern and virulently racist phase" (p. 14) of America's long history of mob violence. In the late nineteenth century, as much of the nation retreated from its mobbing traditions, lynching became a pervasive practice in the South and persisted there into the twentieth century. Moreover, in the South, the connection between lynching and race became much more stark: usually, whites lynched blacks. Thus, the New South--with its economic transformations, with its disfranchisement of African Americans, and with its segregation codes--was also the lynching South.

At the heart of W. Fitzhugh Brundage's work is his analysis of more than five hundred lynchings that took place in Virginia and Georgia during the heyday of the practice. By cross-checking the lists of lynchings compiled by the opponents of lynching against each other and with regional and local newspaper accounts, Brundage determines the number, place, and timing of most lynchings. From the white and black newspaper stories, and from the records of anti-lynching organizations, Brundage establishes the nature of each of these lynchings. From these data he constructs a taxonomy of lynching.

Brundage classifies lynchings into four types according to the size, organization, motivation, and means of the mob. Thus, small mobs with fewer than fifty participants fall into two types: first, terrorist mobs that did not attempt to uphold the law but operated to achieve an illegal goal; and second, private mobs that simply sought vengeance outside the law. Both tended to operate in secret, while the other two types of mobs--posse and mass--openly proclaimed their activities. Indeed, posse mobs (which varied in size) grew out of attempts to catch lawbreakers but quickly degenerated into immediate and indiscriminate violence against any blacks whom they encountered. In white eyes, such mobs remained, for much of the era, clothed in legality. The final category of mob, the mass mob, assumed that the legal system could not deal with the offender. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Book Reviews -- Lynching in the New South: Georgia and Virginia, 1880-1930 (Blacks in the New World Series) by W. Fitzhugh Brundage
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.