A Resource for Addiction Counseling: Licensed Chemical Dependency Counselors in Texas

By Miller, Kathryn J. | TCA Journal, Spring 2001 | Go to article overview

A Resource for Addiction Counseling: Licensed Chemical Dependency Counselors in Texas


Miller, Kathryn J., TCA Journal


Licensed Professional Counselors (LPCs) and school counselors increasingly find themselves asked to work cooperatively with Licensed Chemical Dependency Counselors (LCDCs) in a variety of work settings. This article addresses the scope of practice of LCDCs, their current licensing requirements, and some misconceptions about the alcohol and other drug (ADD) counseling field. Unfamiliarity with the role of the LCDC, combined with misunderstandings about the AOD field may prevent productive working relationships between mental health professionals and LCDCs. This may interfere with providing quality service to the many clients who present with AOD issues.

Substance abuse and addiction counseling is increasingly being recognized as an important specialty within the counseling profession. For example, the National Board of Certified Counselors offers Master Addictions Counselor Certification. The Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP) includes knowledge of substance abuse and addiction issues as a graduate-level counselor training requirement for six of the nine types it accredits (CACREP, 2000). In a recent issue of the TCA Journal, Shearer and Baletka (1999) described the shortage of counselors who are fully qualified to work with substanceabusing offenders. That shortage may well apply to the non-offending population as well, since most graduate counseling programs require little or no concentrated study of alcohol and other drug (AOD) issues (Morgan, Toloczko & Comly, 1997).

In contrast, the typical Licensed Chemical Dependency Counselor (LCDC) in Texas, whose training lacks the breadth of a graduate counseling program, has the depth of training in AOD issues. Therefore, LPCs and school counselors might consider the specialized training of LCDCs a valuable resource in working with the formidable number of clients with AOD issues.

Scope of Practice of LCDCs

The LCDC licensure rules (Texas Commission on Alcohol and Drug Abuse, 2000) permit LCDCs in Texas to provide chemical dependency services involving the application of the principles, methods, and procedures of the chemical dependency profession as defined by the profession's ethical standards and the Twelve Core Functions. The Twelve Core Functions are the counselor tasks which the International Certification and Reciprocity Consortium/Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse, Inc. (ICRC/AODA) has identified as being crucial for AOD counselors to perform competently. Those core functions are: screening, intake, orientation, assessment, treatment planning, counseling, case management, crisis intervention, client education, referral, report and record keeping, and consultation. A thorough description of the Twelve Core Functions can be found in Global criteria of the 12 core functions of the substance abuse counselor (3rd ed.) (Herdman, 2001).

The Texas Commission on Alcohol and Drug Abuse (TCADA) endorses the knowledge, skills and attitudes (KSAs) delineated by the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment (CSAT), as applicable to LCDCs in Texas. Counselors, regardless of their educational level, are expected to master these KSAs, if they work with AOD clients. CSAT (1998) identifies eight practice dimensions to which the KSAs apply: clinical evaluation, treatment planning, referral, service coordination, counseling, client, family and community education, documentation, and professional and ethical responsibilities.

The following provides specific examples of what falls within LCDCs' scope of practice:

Example 1: An LCDC may apply diagnostic criteria to substance-related disorders. The LCDC may offer diagnostic impressions if he or she suspects that other kinds of disorders are present, along with a recommendation for further assessment by another mental health or medical professional. LCDCs are trained in principles of dual diagnosis, and how to use the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

A Resource for Addiction Counseling: Licensed Chemical Dependency Counselors in Texas
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.