Recipe for Good Life Cookies

By Chojnowski, J. P. | TCA Journal, Spring 2001 | Go to article overview

Recipe for Good Life Cookies


Chojnowski, J. P., TCA Journal


Ingredients:

* a giant-sized box of humor

* a full gallon of encouragement

* a container of skills, in the flavors of doing and thinking

* vast amount of learning experiences

* a generous dollop of religion

* bushels and bushels of love

* a bag of wacky family stories

* essence of puppy dogs and kitty cats

* a full scoop of values and standards

* a large bottle of structure sauce

* as many relatives as will fit

* lots of different flavors of friends

* the right amount of doctor visits to make good health

* spice of sympathy and empathy

* a handful of responsibilities

* one cup of pure joy

* taste of gerbils, hamsters, & lizards

* 3 cans of consistency

* just enough rules

* a heaping bowl of parental kindness

Turn on the oven. Put the setting on "good life."

Directions:

If possible, have one or both parents help you bake these cookies, or someone else who really loves you. These grown-ups will have most of these ingredients on hand. But sometimes, if they happen to be out of something, they'll be able to borrow or even find a good substitution so that the recipe turns out just the way you want it to.

Be close and cozy as you work on your recipe. This is the time for smiling, sharing secrets and maybe hugging. If you happen to spill an ingredient, don't worry. You can re-measure or add more. If you happen to end up covered in learning experiences, laugh as much as you want, and feel free to experiment! Once you know what causes spills and messes, and how to properly clean them up, you won't let those little accidents upset you the next time you bake. The best part is that the more you work with the ingredients, the more experienced you become in how to use them. You learn how precious the recipe is for making Good Life cookies. …

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