From Anvils to Table Knives - Who Made What in Sheffield

By Hall, Elton W. | The Chronicle of the Early American Industries Association, Inc., September 2004 | Go to article overview

From Anvils to Table Knives - Who Made What in Sheffield


Hall, Elton W., The Chronicle of the Early American Industries Association, Inc.


From Anvils to Table Knives - Who Made What in Sheffield A Directory of Sheffield Including the Manufacturers of the adjacent Villages: With the several Marks of the Cutlers, Scissor & Filesmiths, Edgetool, & Sickle Makers with an introduction by Jane Rees. Bath, U. K: Tool and Trade History Society, 2004. 97 pp. $21.75.

One of the most valuable things an historical association such as TATHS or EAIA can do is to publish important primary source material. Such publications are not always commercially viable in today's market, so they are done ever less frequently. Nevertheless, primary source material, whether manuscript or printed matter, contains information gathered and recorded by people who were present in a certain place and time-recorded facts that are very difficult to track down two centuries later.

Directories were first published as a means for those working in the various trades or needing their services and products to know where to find one another. By the end of the eighteenth century, most manufacturing cities in England had their own. This volume is a reprint of the 1787 Directory of Sheffield and adjacent villages. Reflecting the primary purpose of the original publication, the directory begins with an alphabetical list of trades showing practitioners of the mechanical arts from anvilmakers to makers of table knives. The listings are grouped first by those within Sheffield and then by those in the neighborhood of Sheffield, again reflecting the need for convenient communication.

The second part of the directory is an alphabetical list of the principal tradesmen and inhabitants of Sheffield giving their name, occupation, and street. If one seeks a particular person, these lists are invaluable. Moreover, a browse through the list affords one a glimpse into the composition of the people of Sheffield and the kinds of things they did. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

From Anvils to Table Knives - Who Made What in Sheffield
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.