Making the Best Even Better

By Connor, Greg | Law & Order, October 2004 | Go to article overview

Making the Best Even Better


Connor, Greg, Law & Order


Have you noticed the strong parallels between law enforcement training and those of sports programs throughout the country? From grade school to high school, and then on to college, the sports philosophy of "stronger and faster" has emerged as the route best traveled in plan and practice. The results have been staggering: records of the past are repeatedly broken, fantastic performances are presented with regularity, and the once thought unobtainable goals are readily positioned on the modern sports horizon.

So too, the law enforcement profession is developing "super stars"; officers skilled in strategies and tactics, who are able to articulate the complex issues and ideals in contemporary policing, while achieving overwhelming successes within the most difficult of enforcement environments are more and more common. Police "olympians" are promoted and supported by agencies and associations throughout the country. The profession has an increasing proliferation of specialized officers in assignments and units in almost every agency.

In law enforcement, stellar strategists have become more and more sophisticated in their tools and tactics by tailoring their talents toward what seems to be limitless challenges and goals. As a result, the police masses are still tactically void, in time loosing even their "minimum skills" received in recruit school. Field analysis indicates that the majority of officers frequently fail to function effectively on a basic level; continuing to repeat the same errors they have made before, creating an even greater distance between themselves and their uniquely developing colleagues.

Officers need to bring the core component of police veterans up to practical and purposeful levels of enforcement efficiency, by seeking and satisfying the primary principles of training and performance. …

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