Music Chronicle II

By Dhuga, U. S. | The Hudson Review, Autumn 2004 | Go to article overview

Music Chronicle II


Dhuga, U. S., The Hudson Review


Music Chronicle II

WHY ALL THE FUSS ABOUT WYNTON MARSALIS ' ALL RlSE, commissioned by Kurt Masur and the New York Philharmonic? The thing-I can't think by what other noun to call it-was first performed on December 29, 1999, at Avery Fisher Hall; and on this July 9, 2004 Opening Night concert at Tanglewood, we were supposed to have been edified anew: "The 20th century has been one of communication. The 21st will be the century of integration." So announces Marsalis in the boggling program. Though smartly arranged in a blues form-twelve movements to the twelve bars-the continuity of the thing is little helped by two intermissions: perhaps those quidnuncs who have long been heralding the Death of the Attention Span are right after all.

Marsalis claims, "I don't strive to combine many different styles in a 'world-music' type of mélange. I only try to hear that they are the same." But are they really the same? Or is Marsalis' pretension to creating a sort of musical universalism merely solipsistic (where the stress in "I only try")? One simply cannot make different ethno-musical elements conform in a single whole as if those elements were "the same," as if the words from the ill-named seventh movement of "All Rise," viz. "The Halls of Erudition and Scholarship (Come Back Home)," actually have universal resonance:

Raise your heart to feel the Love of our Lord.

Let God be what God is in you.

Little David come play your harp, And the angels sing.

I hear Gabriel a blowin' his horn, baa-bee-doo-bee

Doo-bee-baa-bee doo-bee-doo baa-doo-bee doo-bee doo-bee

A taabla player from, say, Horshiarpur, might very well ask, "Who is David? And Gabriel? And what is doo-bee-baa?" Never mind the lyrics' too-clever-by-a-half attempt to be "meta" ("What ho! Marsalis is blowing his horn-just like Gabriel!"). The music's insistence on its own universalism and "integration"-programmatically heralded in the very title "All Rise"-masks what is really little more than a mélange (after all) of beebop and gospel with flimsy lyrics. If any reader can explain to me the sense of "But don't you think that you can feel my song, / Lest you comfort me," do please write in, and I'll send you a fiver.

Masur was superfluous tonight: his movements did not in any way correspond with what the players themselves were doing. Two of the movements, I should admit, I did quite enjoy: the third, "Go Slow (But Don't Stop)" and the fourth, "Wild Strumming of Fiddle," displayed some excellent piano work by Eric Lewis of the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra. The nicely named alto saxophonist Wess "Warmdaddy" Anderson produced an apposite sound reminiscent of the great Benny Carter from his Art Tatum days. But just when the orchestra began, so to speak, to swing, there came one of those intermissions-after which, unhappily, we did not pick up where we left off. The rest of the evening my ears were numbed by the incessant, senseless "Zum, zum, zum, I am, I am, I am, / I am, I am, I am, I am." Doo-bee-doo indeed.

Tanglewood was not only more palatable but excellent on July 30, when Richard Goode performed Mozart's Piano Concerto no. 24 in C minor, KV 291, with Edo de Waart-chief conductor of the Netherlands Opera-leading the Boston Symphony Orchestra. Goode has himself recorded several of the Mozart concertos with the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra. While I regard Goode's recording of Piano Concerti nos. 18 in B-flat major (K 456) and 20 in D minor (K 466) as definitive,1 my version of preference for no. 24 has always been the lively, brisk recording of Artur Schnabel from June 1948 with Walter Susskind leading the Philharmonia Orchestra.2 To my mind it is in this 24th of Mozart's piano concert! more than in any other that the pianist has the most melodic impact upon, and autonomy from, the orchestra: it is no wonder that Sviatoslav Richter quipped, after his performance of the concerto on August 8, 1971 at the Palais Princier de Monaco, "I can't say that Matacic's [the conductor's] accompaniment was to my liking-Mozart isn't his cup of tea" (as if a conductor were but an accom- panist! …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Music Chronicle II
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.