Parenting in Poor Environments: Stress, Support and Coping

By Backett-Milburn, Kathryn | Journal of Marriage and Family, December 2004 | Go to article overview

Parenting in Poor Environments: Stress, Support and Coping


Backett-Milburn, Kathryn, Journal of Marriage and Family


Parenting in Poor Environments: Stress, Support and Coping. Deborah Ghate and Neal Hazel. London and New York: Jessica Kingsley Publishers Limited. 2002. 314 pp. ISBN 1-84310-069-X. $28.95 (paper).

The study reported in this excellent book was commissioned by the U.K. Department of Health and carried out by the Policy Research Bureau. Evidently, part of the remit was to produce a clear steer for policy development, which the authors provide, but this is also highquality academic work, which is sometimes difficult to achieve within the constraints of such commissions.

In the United Kingdom, we are well provided with quantitative evidence about the extent and nature of poverty in our society. Fewer studies exist that give insight into the everyday experience and meanings of poverty. The research reported in this book fills some of those gaps with regard to parenting. It draws on face-to-face survey interviews with a nationally representative sample of parents (n = 1,754) living in objectively defined "poor environments," and 40 in-depth interviews with parents in especially difficult circumstances. The research drew on an "ecological" model of parenting, which encompasses the different levels of individuals, families, and households, and the community or local environment. The authors address whether families in poor environments are subject to Stressors known to increase the risk of difficulties with parenting; the interface between stress factors, social support, resilience, and coping with parenting; and what parents themselves want from social support.

Much of the value of this book lies in the sensible, sensitive, and conceptually reflective way in which findings are discussed and unpacked, always valuing the respondents as the best commentators on their own lives. The study concludes that because of elevated levels of adversity for parents and their children, and often quite clearly because of poverty as a distal factor, parenting in a poor environment is undoubtedly particularly difficult and fraught with risks. Nevertheless, this book encourages us to question some well-worn stereotypes. For instance, although we are not surprised to be told that parents in poor environments are in substantially worse physical and emotional health than the rest of the population, there are fewer dramatic differentials in their children's physical and behavioral problems, though the authors acknowledge that children growing up in poverty may be storing up problems for the future. Similarly, with regard to the problems of lone parenting, logistic regression analysis shows poverty rather than marital status to be the significant factor, often suggesting that life with a partner is not necessarily any rosier.

Although many parents readily identified problems with their neighborhoods and local areas, and these risky environments (neighborhood incivilities, housing conditions, physically dirty and degraded environmental conditions) became riskier the poorer the area, most respondents said that their area was a reasonable place to bring up children, that local people were friendly, and that they knew some neighbors personally. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Parenting in Poor Environments: Stress, Support and Coping
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.