Powers and Submissions: Spirituality, Philosophy and Gender

By Starkey, A. Denise | Anglican Theological Review, Fall 2004 | Go to article overview

Powers and Submissions: Spirituality, Philosophy and Gender


Starkey, A. Denise, Anglican Theological Review


Powers and Submissions: Spirituality, Philosophy and Gender. By Sarah Coakley. Challenges in Contemporary Theology Series. Oxford and Maiden, Mass.: Blackwell, 2002. xx + 172 pp. $70.95/£50.00 (cloth); $30.95/£16.99 (paper).

The essays collected in Powers and Submissions are remarkably cohesive and stimulating. At the heart of the work is Coakley's overarching desire to engage "the paradox of power and vulnerability" (p. 34) through critical, constructive, and contemplative retrievals of patristic, mystical, and Enlightenment texts. The pervasive subordinating and disempowering of women through Christian interpretations of submission, self-emptying, sacrifice, and self-denial has resulted in many opting for a post-Christian stance. Coakley shares a deep agreement with these critiques, while also representing well-known feminist theologians who choose to remain Christian while bringing a deep acuity to the monumental task of retrieving and reconstructing the tradition from the ground up. At the same time, Coakley issues a clarion call to Christian feminism to recognize an inherent "danger . . . in the repression of all forms of 'vulnerability,' and in a concomitant failure to confront issues of fragility, suffering, or self-emptying except in terms of victimology" (p. 33).

In the stellar first chapter, "Kenosis and Subversion: On the Repression of 'Vulnerability' in Christian Feminist Writing," Coakley delivers a virtuoso study of the doctrine of kenosis that culminates in her argument for the necessity of an apopliatic, contemplative stance. While Coakley recognizes that lier call for embracing contemplative silence is a "risky" one, she argues that it is "profoundly transformative, 'empowering' in a mysterious 'Christie' sense. . . . If, then, these traditions of Christian 'contemplation' are to be trusted, this rather special form of 'vulnerability' is not an invitation to be battered; nor is its silence a silencing" (p. 35). The paradox of vulnerability does not intend the co-opting of women's emerging knowing and empowerment. It does, however, acknowledge creaturely dependence upon Cod "because it is as well to bring to consciousness how . …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Powers and Submissions: Spirituality, Philosophy and Gender
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.