The Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries' Collaboration with the Association of American Medical Colleges, Medical Library Association, and Other Organizations

By Jenkins, Carol G.; Bader, Shelley A. | Journal of the Medical Library Association, April 2003 | Go to article overview

The Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries' Collaboration with the Association of American Medical Colleges, Medical Library Association, and Other Organizations


Jenkins, Carol G., Bader, Shelley A., Journal of the Medical Library Association


The Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries has made collaboration with other organizations a fundamental success strategy throughout its twenty-five year history. From the beginning its relationships with Association of American Medical Colleges and with the Medical Library Association have shaped its mission and influenced its success at promoting academic health sciences libraries' roles in their institutions. This article describes and evaluates those relationships. It also describes evolving relationships with other organizations including the National Library of Medicine and the Association of Research Libraries.

INTRODUCTION

In many ways, the achievements of the Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries (AAHSL) over its first twenty-five years of existence are nothing short of remarkable considering its small membership and budget. From its inception, AAHSL faced significant challenges. Not all academic health sciences library directors were convinced in 1978 of the efficacy of creating a new association to promote the common interests of their libraries, separate from the broader mission of the larger Medical Library Association (MLA). And the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC), with whom AAHSL sought to affiliate, had no means to accommodate a new organization that was not a scientific society. These challenges have been overcome, and AAHSL has succeeded as an independent association whose success is all the more notable because of the strong platform of collaboration with other organizations upon which it rests.

AAHSL's leaders expressed interest from the outset in collaboration with the AAMC as the means to influence improvements in medical education. While eventually achieving its initial goal of acceptance into the AAMC Council of Academic Societies, AAHSL has gone on to foster additional relationships with the AAMC organization where common interests are served in the areas of medical education, information technology and resources, and governmental relations. AAHSL's leadership also has consistently supported shared agendas with the Medical Library Association (MLA) and the National Library of Medicine (NLM). Within the past decade, AAHSL and the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) have joined forces to advance legislative interests, leadership development initiatives, and library assessment projects.

AAHSL has demonstrated successful collaboration with these and other agencies because of several key factors:

* it has credibility as the organization that speaks for academic health sciences libraries and their importance in academic health centers in the United States and Canada;

* it has a proven track record through high-impact projects that have contributed to improved libraries, including developing planning and evaluation guidelines, assessing the value of libraries in the accreditation of medical schools, pursuing legislative advocacy, and publishing annual library statistics; and

* it actively seeks collaborative relationships that can help accomplish shared goals while maintaining its independent programs.

These factors were part of the original vision that guided AAHSL's founders, and these factors remain important today.

RELATIONSHIP WITH THE ASSOCIATION OF AMERICAN MEDICAL COLLEGES (AAMC)

The most significant evidence of AAHSL's success at collaboration is with the AAMC.

Council of Academic Societies (CAS) affiliation

One of the primary arguments for organizing a new association of academic health sciences library directors was to strengthen the libraries by increasing their participation in national efforts to improve medical education. The direct linkage with the AAMC was cast when the initial letters of invitation were sent to directors of the primary libraries serving U.S. medical schools that were members of the AAMC [I].

In its inaugural year, AAHSL's initial application for membership in AAMC's Council of Academic Societies (CAS) was not approved. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries' Collaboration with the Association of American Medical Colleges, Medical Library Association, and Other Organizations
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.