Automated Telephone Alert Systems

By Careless, James | Law & Order, November 2004 | Go to article overview

Automated Telephone Alert Systems


Careless, James, Law & Order


The territory covered by the Weld County, CO Sheriff's, Office is vast. At about 4,000 square miles in total, it stretches from Denver north to Nebraska and Wyoming. Most of Weld County is rugged and remote, with many sparsely populated areas.

For the 76 Weld County officers under Sheriff John Cooke's command, this makes urban style patrolling impossible: there's just too much land to cover. As a result, it's difficult to catch suspects without the public's help. This is why the Weld County Sheriff's Office has recently adopted an automated telephone public alert system: when a crime happens in a specific region, the Sheriff's Office records a public warning, then has the system automatically call local residents and play it to them over the phone.

The result: armed with the description of the suspects, local residents can keep an eye out for them, and tip off police when they're spotted. As Cooke will tell you, this system works. According to the sheriff, since the inception and implementation of the program two years ago, the telephone alert system has resulted in numerous arrests and subsequent convictions.

The System

The name of Weld County's telephone system is IntelliCast Target Notification (ITN). It is designed, manufactured, and supported by Intrado, a company with 25 years' experience in 911 systems design and support.

Here's how ITN works: when a child goes missing, the parent calls their local police department. Once their call has been validated, the police department records an audio bulletin, then decides which geographic area the child is likely to be in. This data is then sent to Intrado's telephone center, which has 1,152 dedicated lines available.

Intrado uses its geocoded database (it cross-references physical maps location to a 911 database address) to relay this message to telephone subscribers in the designated area. The Intrado office manager for notification, Tom Cowherd, noted that this happens quite quickly-at a rate of thousands of homes called per minute.

Of course, this service isn't free: the department pays Intrado at a rate of 23 cents per call for messages 30 seconds or less, and 46 cents for 31 to 60 seconds. In many instances, this cost can be recovered from the department's local E-911 committee, or through grants from the Department of Homeland security. Certainly this is the case for the Weld County Sheriff's Office. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Automated Telephone Alert Systems
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.