Florida Law Enforcement Challenge

By Weiss, Jim; Davis, Mickey | Law & Order, November 2004 | Go to article overview

Florida Law Enforcement Challenge


Weiss, Jim, Davis, Mickey, Law & Order


Each year in the US, traffic crashes take 42,000 lives and cost over $230 billion. They are the leading cause of death to young children. Traffic accident injuries affect the quality of life for 3.2 million people nationwide.

In the state of Florida, 562,000 people are involved in traffic crashes annually and half are killed or injured. Two-thirds of those killed failed to use their safety restraints. As a matter of fact, one-third of Florida traffic fatalities are alcohol related. Three people are injured each hour due to impaired drivers.

These statistics place a ponderous traffic enforcement and education responsibility upon the troopers, sheriff's deputies, police officers, and citizens of the state. Many agencies are taking the initiative to reduce those crash and injury figures.

One Good Idea Leads to Another

The 2004 Florida Law Enforcement Challenge was a cooperative effort between the Florida Department of Transportation, the Institute of Police Technology and Management, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, and the International Association of Chiefs of Police. This program, funded by the Florida Department of Transportation, encourages law enforcement agencies to set new goals for the reduction of traffic crashes, as well as acts as a forum for shared experiences and effort recognition.

The categories for the police and sheriffs' offices challenge are based upon the size of the agencies. In addition to the police and sheriff's office awards, there are special challenge categories that include the Buckle-Up Florida Award, an award for specialized law enforcement agencies such as college and park police, the Florida Highway Patrol Troop Award and the Championship Class Award, which is a special category made up of first place winners from the year before. The challenge also acts in partnership with the IACP National Chiefs Challenge and its National Special Awards.

The following agencies represent the doggedly determined programs of an award-winning sheriff's office, a police department and a Florida Highway Patrol troop.

Florida Highway Patrol

Florida Highway Patrol's Troop A won first place in the Championship Category. According to Major Randy Brown, Troop A's efforts in the Florida Panhandle area were two-pronged: education and enforcement. The program has resulted in a reduction in fatal crashes and increased traffic enforcement. Community safety education included utilizing a seat belt rollover simulator at schools to demonstrate the dangers of not wearing a seat belt compared to wearing one.

A solid enforcement program deters average motorists from developing bad driving habits and keeps bad drivers in check. Last year troopers worked in partnership with 20 law enforcement agencies in the Florida panhandle to reduce crashes. One target was US Highway 98. The program, called Strike Force 98, was a special enforcement initiative to reduce the rising fatality and crash rate on that highway. It proved to be so successful that it spread north to the I-10 corridor.

Strike Force 98 concentrated on impaired drivers, speeding violations, and seat belt laws. Troop A upgraded its DUI countermeasures. Troopers also participated in a number of DUI checkpoints throughout the region, for both local and FHP checkpoints. Other agencies were always invited to participate in checkpoints and wolf packs. Strike Force 98's efforts were impressive and received considerable media coverage.

Another program aimed to reduce the number of unrestrained children in vehicles and educate parents in the proper installation of child safety seats. Parents often improperly install their children's car seats because of confusion due to the variety of manufacturers, child safety seat designs, and auto seat belt arrangements. Troop A worked at checkpoints with other law enforcement agencies and civilian volunteer groups to educate parents and ensure proper installation. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Florida Law Enforcement Challenge
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.